January 2011 Nuclear News is online

The January issue of Nuclear News has been published and mailed to American Nuclear Society members, and is available electronically to members. The issue contains a special section on education, training, and workforce issues. Features include:

  • Audeen Fentiman: NEDHO and nuclear engineering education, interview by Rick Michal
  • John Gutteridge moves on, by Rick Michal
  • A one-stop shop for new entrant nuclear states, by Rick Michal
  • Southern Nuclear’s Operator Jump Start
  • IAEA launches nuclear energy management school, by Gamini Seneviratne

In addition, the January issue contains E. Michael Blake’s “COLs on the horizon,” which is a look at what to expect in the industry in 2011.

There also is a special report on the ANS Winter Meeting in Las Vegas in November 2010, and meeting reports on the embedded topicals at the Winter Meeting:

  • Is inertial fusion now at pace with magnetic?
  • Use of isotopes continues to rise
  • Moving ahead with digital I&C upgrades

Other items of note in the January issue include the index to the 2010 Nuclear News contents; Shaw partners with Toshiba to build ABWRs, including two at the South Texas Project site; Exelon announces that it will retire Oyster Creek in 2019; Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards meets on the AP1000; Energy Secretary Chu favors nuclear for “clean energy” standard; I&C pilot project status sought for Crystal River-3; Energy Information Administration sees “overnight” cost increase of 37 percent; new contention denied in Vogtle licensing proceeding; NRC renews Cooper operating license until 2034; IAEA moves to establish assured reserve of reactor fuel; NRC okays Russian control of uranium recovery licenses; EPRI says early movement of used fuel to dry storage has no advantages; new NRC rule aims to prevent creation of legacy sites; prospects resurface for nuclear-powered ships; fuel channel replacement completed at South Korea’s Wolsong; and the United States and Japan form nuclear cooperation working group.

This post first appeared on the ANS Nuclear Cafe.