Friday Nuclear Matinee: Nuclear Power – How It Works

With Unit 6 returning from a planned maintenance outage earlier this week, all 8 reactors at the world’s largest nuclear electrical generating station are now online, generating emission-free electricity from the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station in Ontario, Canada (“Full Power at the Bruce“).

So… who better to demonstrate “How Nuclear Power Works” than Ontario Power Generation, owners of “The Bruce” (and owner/operators of the Pickering and Darlington nuclear generating stations)?  Unless it would be Bruce Power, licensed developers and operators of the Bruce station.  But let’s start here with a fine feature by OPG.  Enjoy!

(also including bonus features on Hydroelectric Power and Thermal Power which are quite interesting in their own right)


Thanks to Ontario Power Generation

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3 Responses to Friday Nuclear Matinee: Nuclear Power – How It Works

  1. It should be so helpful to all of young generation those who are interested in nuclear division and wants to solve power problem in their country.If everybody think like the same and goes to implementation of this education everybody of that country will be helpful

  2. James Greenidge

    It says something when here in NYC for at least since 1998 (via my Board of Ed family members who liaison with Westinghouse about these things) that hasn’t been a single junior/senior high science fair nuclear plant exhibit city wide. I’m not talking about winners or runners up — I’m talking about _actual nuclear exhibits_ in every school. Lotsa volcanoes. Lotsa pinwheel windmills. Lotsa of tidal electric. Lotsa garbage combustion. Lotsa solar panel car stuff. Nada nuclear. And the media doesn’t question why while they admire cow chip power exhibits. Nuclear energy is a pariah in school systems. I long suspected way earlier since Con-Ed just totally and inanely shied any public Ad/PSA nuclear education about Indian Point — and the current owners are no more wise in the public perception department. If this speaks the same nationwide, then the future of considerable nuclear expansion is very very questionable.

    James Greenidge
    Queens NY

  3. Brian Mays

    James – I think that’s a nationwide trend. These days, I often volunteer judge science-fair projects in my community. The top projects these days just aren’t the same caliber that they were, say, 25 years ago.