Nuclear Matinee – James Hansen on Nuclear Power

James Hansen, former head of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, earlier this year co-authored a study that conservatively estimated that nuclear power has saved 1.8 million lives since 1971 that otherwise would have been lost due to fossil fuel pollution and associated causes. For more information, see this post at Scientific American blogs—and this previous ANS nuclear matinée.

Hansen’s specialty is climate change, and he is the leading climate change scientist in the United States. Filmmaker Robert Stone, director of the recent groundbreaking nuclear energy documentary Pandora’s Promise, conducted this fascinating interview with Hansen concerning his very strong views on the future of nuclear power in that context.

Thanks to Pandora’s Promise for sharing this interview

smokestacks

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One Response to Nuclear Matinee – James Hansen on Nuclear Power

  1. James Greenidge

    Actually I think the number 1.8 million lives spared is a gross underestimation in lieu global population and numbers of reactors going operational since the early ’70s. Several tens of millions at least smells more right in my book. Speaking of environment, I notice how lately the fair and rational media in Japan and here are in a tizzy about how Fukushima is “spewing” and “gushing” several liters per hour of irradiated water into the ground and ocean. If anyone takes a long study of the tsunami videos showing massive waves plowing inland through smashed coastal towns and cities churned into a thick muddy goo and brew of every possible thing you can find like sludge, raw sewage, storm drain excrement, industrial chemicals, gasoline and insecticides and tars, unearthed body parts from cemeteries, slaughterhouse parts, go on and on — and not most of it ran back out to sea but was left behind inland as a goo percolating into the ground in such sticky toxicity that the Japanese Government isn’t even airing research into it, hiding behind the decoy skirts of Fukushima. Which is the greater threat to groundwater and public health I wonder; a few radioative (decaying fast) atoms per cubic meter of local Fukushima ground water seeping into the ocean that wouldn’t even register on most Geiger counters, or groundwater tainted for how long by a far more widespread nasty toxic chemical and organic brew which medical science knows has a far more deleterious effect?

    James Greenidge
    Queens NY