Category Archives: Honors & Awards

ANS Honors & Awards

Aris Candris honored with Henry DeWolf Smyth Nuclear Statesman Award

Aris Candris

Aris Candris, Ph.D., senior advisor and a member of the Westinghouse Electric Company Board of Directors, is the recipient of the 2012 Henry DeWolf Smyth Nuclear Statesman Award. Established in 1972 by the American Nuclear Society and the Nuclear Energy Institute, the Smyth Award recognizes outstanding and statesmanlike service in the development and safe management of nuclear energy science. The award commemorates a lifetime’s achievement in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy.

Loewen

“Aris Candris is an international leader in nuclear science and technology innovation,” said ANS President Eric Loewen, who presented the award yesterday at the Nuclear Energy Assembly held in Charlotte, N.C. “His dedication to developing and deploying advanced reactor designs will benefit people worldwide for generations by expanding the use of clean, safe, and reliable nuclear energy.

“Aris Candris has helped instill a commitment to excellence in the nuclear energy industry that extends far beyond the offices and production facilities of Westinghouse Electric. His leadership has been instrumental in the strides made by the company and by our industry over the past three decades,” said Marvin Fertel, president and chief executive officer of the Nuclear Energy Institute.

Fertel

“I have no doubt that our industry will continue to owe him and the Westinghouse reactor design team a debt of gratitude in the decades ahead for their pioneering work to bring to market a new-generation technology to produce low-carbon electricity. The culture of innovation that Aris has fostered will help reassert American leadership in the export of nuclear energy technologies and services for many, many years to come.”

Candris has had a distinguished career in nuclear services with Westinghouse Electric Company. He is the former president and CEO of Westinghouse Electric Company, a position he held from July 2008 to April 2012. Prior to serving as president and CEO, he held a variety of leadership positions. He began his Westinghouse career in 1975 as a senior engineer in the former Advanced Reactor Division.

Smyth

Henry DeWolf Smyth was a Princeton University physicist, served on the Atomic Energy Commission from 1949-54, and was a U.S. representative to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

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Founding chair of ANS Young Members Group wins Landis Award

By Jennifer Varnedoe

David Pointer, principal nuclear engineer at Argonne National Laboratory and the founding chair of the American Nuclear Society’s Young Members Group (YMG), was honored with the 2012 ANS Landis Young Member Engineering Achievement Award. The award recognizes an individual who has made significant technical contributions in any one of the many engineering disciplines served by ANS. The contributions can be in the form of a new principle, concept, design, method of analysis, product emanating from research or development, or from effective application of engineering knowledge to yield a commercial service or product needed in the nuclear energy enterprise.

Pointer

Pointer received the award in recognition of his outstanding young career, exceptional technical achievements, and excellence in leadership to support the development of next-generation simulation tools on high-performance computing platforms. He is currently the technical lead in the development of the SHARP toolset, an integrated code able to address reactor multi-physics problems (thermal-hydraulics, neutronics, structural mechanics) in a fully coupled manner.  Among his numerous achievements are notably the development of innovative aerodynamic solutions for trailer-trucks, the development of multi-phase computational fluid dynamics models, and ground-breaking simulations of large-scale sodium fast reactor assemblies.

Pointer also received the YMG Excellence Award in 2007. A long-time member of YMG, and now a supporter of its mission, he exemplifies how YMG can be instrumental in promoting and fostering a young professional’s career through ANS. He had this to say about his vision of the role of YMG and how it helped him:

“The ANS Young Members Group was established to enable the next generation of nuclear professionals to reap the full benefits of active involvement in the Society much earlier in their careers.  My involvement in YMG has enabled me to take a much more active role in the development of my career, and I credit much of my success to the strong relationships I’ve forged through YMG.”

The Landis Award will be presented to Pointer at the ANS Annual Meeting in Chicago, in June.  Join us there to toast Dave Pointer for this prestigious achievement!

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Varnedoe

Jennifer Varnedoe is chair of the ANS Young Members Group. She is a project engineer with Advanced Programs at GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy. She has been an ANS member since 2007 and is a guest contributor to the ANS Nuclear Cafe.

 

ANS Board Member Steven Arndt named Federal Engineer of the Year

Steven A. Arndt, Ph.D., P.E., cited as best engineer in federal service

American Nuclear Society board member Steven A. Arndt, Ph.D., P.E., has been named the federal government’s Engineer of the Year by the National Society of Professional Engineers. “Steven is an extremely distinguished member of the Society with a long history of exceptional and diverse public service,” said ANS President Eric Loewen regarding the award. “We’re very fortunate to have him on our board of directors and we extend our heartfelt congratulations to him on this well-deserved recognition.”

Dr. Steven A. Arndt and Mr. David L. Skeen, Director of Japan Lessons-Learned Project Directorate, NRC

Arndt, since 2007 a senior technical advisor in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, has more than 30 years of experience as a nuclear engineer. Much of his career has been at the NRC, but he also co-founded a business supporting the nuclear community. In addition, he served as a professor of nuclear engineering, including two years at the United States Naval Academy. He was appointed by the governor of Maryland to the Maryland State Board for Engineering. During the Fukushima nuclear event, Arndt responded to the NRC’s Operation Center supporting the Japanese government and the U.S. ambassador’s office in his role as a severe accident analyst. He continues to support the NRC–Japan lessons-learned efforts, including screening and prioritizing recommendations for U.S. nuclear plants.
 
When asked about the recognition received on Thursday at a ceremony at the National Press Club in Washington, DC, Arndt said, “I’ve devoted my professional life to nuclear engineering and I’ve enjoyed the opportunities to make contributions. I’m honored to receive this award.”

Christopher M. Stone, P.E., National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE), Dr. Arndt, Mr. Skeen, Lawrence A. Jacobson, executive director NSPE

“Steven is a great example of the dedication and experience of ANS members,” said Loewen. “The country is fortunate to have him acting in a role of such responsibility and importance at the NRC, and we’re fortunate to have him among our membership.”

Christopher Stone, P.E. and Dr. Steven Arndt

For more information about the National Society of Professional Engineers’ awards, please visit the NSPE website.

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Nominate Young Members for National Awards!

By Jennifer Varnedoe and Tim Gnadt

Do you know someone who has worked tirelessly toward integrating young members into the American Nuclear Society? Do you know someone in the ANS Young Members Group who has demonstrated continued overall excellence in many areas? Now is your chance to nominate that person for national recognition of their efforts.

We are now accepting nominations for the Young Members Advancement Award and the Young Member Excellence Award. We invite you to submit a nomination for any eligible and deserving member. Anyone can make a nomination, however self-nomination is not permitted. More information about these awards can be found at Young Members Advancement Award and Young Member Excellence Award on the ANS website, along with the nomination forms. Feel free to contact the YMG Awards and Recognition Committee Lead, Tim Gnadt, for more information.

  • Young Members Advancement Award – Honors an individual or group that has made a significant contribution toward integrating young members into ANS.
  • Young Member Excellence Award – Recognizes a member of the YMG who has demonstrated overall excellence in a variety of areas.

These awards are an opportunity to highlight up-and-coming leaders of the society for their encouragement, hard-work, and enthusiasm. One of the most rewarding aspects of my ANS membership is working toward a common goal with people who are amazingly passionate and brilliant. We hope that over the coming years, we are able to recognize all of the exemplary young professionals and mentors whose contributions make ANS the extraordinary organization that it is!

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Varnedoe

Jennifer Varnedoe is chair of the ANS Young Members Group. She is a project engineer with Advanced Programs at GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy. She has been an ANS member since 2007 and is a guest contributor to the ANS Nuclear Cafe.

Gnadt

Tim Gnadt has been the chair of the YMG Awards and Recognition Committee since January 2011, and a member of the YMG since November 2009. He is active duty in the US Navy and works as an instructor at its prototype training facility in upstate New York.

ANS 2012-13 scholarship applications are now online

American Nuclear Society scholarship applications for the 2012-2013 academic year are now online! Since ANS was established in 1954, it has promoted the awareness and understanding of nuclear science and technology (NS&T). To further that mission, ANS administers scholarships each year that support the development and education of those who will research and implement future applications of NS&T.

More than 20 scholarships named after pioneers and leaders in NS&T are awarded each year by ANS, along with some general scholarships, to students with outstanding academic credentials. Special scholarships are also available to students based on economic need.

Some scholarships are available for students entering their sophomore year and beyond in college, while others are for incoming freshmen.

“These scholarships are one way that the American Nuclear Society advances nuclear science and technology by supporting future nuclear scientists and engineers as they embark on—or continue—their academic studies,” said Craig Williamson, ANS Scholarships Committee chair. “I strongly encourage students who are interested in pursuing studies in nuclear science and technologies to review the guidelines and apply for the scholarships.”

“The scholarships serve as a wonderful introduction for students to become involved in ANS activities as well as to become life long members,” he said.

The deadline for submitting scholarship applications is February 1, 2012 (April 1 for the Incoming Freshman Scholarship). Scholarship descriptions, guidelines, requirements, and applications are located here.

Two members named ANS Fellows

Two members of the American Nuclear Society were named ANS Fellows on November 1 at the ANS Annual Winter Meeting and Nuclear Technology Expo. These awards were presented by ANS President Eric Loewen in recognition of the Fellows’ significant contributions and achievements to nuclear science and technology.

The new ANS Fellows are:

Chin

Bryan Allen Chin, for his outstanding contributions in the development of theories to describe the welding of highly irradiated materials and mechanisms of irradiation effects on fatigue, creep and swelling of in-core materials.

 

 

Petti

David A. Petti, for his exceptional leadership in the development and demonstration of advanced fuels and materials for fission and fusion systems; in particular, the very successful re-engineering, re-establishment of industrial fabrication capability, and irradiation testing and demonstration of high burnup particle fuels for High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors.

The honored membership grade of ANS Fellow is awarded to Society members for outstanding accomplishment in any one of the areas of nuclear science and engineering. These two new ANS Fellows will be listed with their peers on the ANS Web site.

Hall Talk – Nov 1

Our intrepid reporter files another update from the ANS Winter Meeting.

By Dan Yurman

Vermont – Do you know where your electricity comes from?

Power for electric cars comes from where?

At the ANS Green Bag lunch on Monday, Howard Shaffer, PE, of the ANS Vermont Pilot Project, recounted a story of how advocates for the electric car brought one to an anti-nuclear rally in Vermont. Painted on the side in bright letters was the slogan “no nukes.”

Asked if the owner had any sense of the irony that the electricity that charged the car probably came from a carbon emission-free source—namely Vermont Yankee—Shaffer said no.

Granola power!

Shaffer added that anti-nuclear sentiment in Vermont runs much deeper than other places because it is linked to a unique blend of lifestyle politics. Some people in Vermont hold post-industrial Utopian visions of a future society that is decidedly low tech, powered by windmills and solar energy.

Granola is not a usable fuel for fossil or nuclear power plants

People who have a strong hold on these views are aligned with more mainstream green groups. These groups have a broad political base augmented with funding from national organizations.

This is a potent mix that has opposed the relicensing of the Vermont Yankee reactor and which now forms a visible chunk of Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin’s political base. Shumlin has been a leader of the anti-nuclear movement in Vermont, making closure of the plant a central plank of his successful campaign for the governor’s chair.

Green groups are particular rankled by the decision of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to renew the operating license for Vermont Yankee.

A participant in the ANS Green Bag lunch said in response, “The granola culture is very influential, but they have a lack of reality about where their electricity comes from.”

It would seem so.

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Yurman

Dan Yurman publishes Idaho Samizdat, a blog about nuclear energy and is a frequent contributor to ANS Nuclear Cafe.

Two members named ANS Fellows

Two members of the American Nuclear Society were named Fellows during the June 2011 ANS annual conference. These awards were presented in recognition of the Fellows’ significant contributions and achievements to nuclear science and technology.

Hibiki

The new ANS Fellows are:

Takashi Hibiki, for his extensive and outstanding original research contributions to nuclear thermal-hydraulics, two-phase flow modeling, and two-phase flow instrumentation.

 

Nanstad

Randy K. Nanstad, for his internationally recognized expertise on the effects of irradiation on fracture behavior of reactor pressure vessel steels. His ground-breaking research includes the design and conduct of large national irradiation programs, development and analysis of extensive irradiation effects databases, and critical contributions to our understanding of embrittlement mechanisms.

 

The honored membership grade of Fellow is  awarded to ANS members for outstanding accomplishment in any one of the areas of nuclear science and engineering.  The two new Fellows will be listed with their peers on the ANS Web site.

The passing of the gavel

Following the ANS Board of Directors meeting on Thursday, June 30, Eric Loewen officially became ANS President and Joe Colvin transitioned to ANS Immediate Past President. The picture below marks the presentation of a symbolic gavel from the ANS President to the ANS Immediate Past President.

ANS President Eric Loewen presents a commemorative gavel to ANS Immediate Past President Joe Colvin.

 

ANS “Nuclear Statesman” Award to Dale Klein

Former NRC chairman is honored at American Nuclear Society national meeting

By Dan Yurman

Dale Klein, Ph.D.

Dale Klein, former chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), received the Henry DeWolf Smyth “Nuclear Statesman” award on June 27, 2011, at the national meeting of the American Nuclear Society (ANS).

The award, which is given jointly by ANS and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI), recognizes Klein’s outstanding contributions to the nuclear energy field in the United States and around the world over the past 25 years. Klein, who has been a lifelong educator with the University of Texas, also served as an assistant secretary of Defense. He holds a Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from the University of Missouri.

In making the award, ANS President Joe Colvin said, “I am very honored to present this award to a distinguished member of our community, who is also a long -time friend of mine; Dale represents everything I admire about our colleagues: he’s committed to the future of nuclear energy, which he has demonstrated by his dedication and public service.”

“Nominees for this award exemplify the highest level of commitment to policy and statesmanlike conduct,” noted Colvin. He added, “We are fortunate to have such an extraordinary individual as a member and co-chair of ANS’s Special Committee on Fukushima, whose charter is to provide a clear and concise explanation of the events surrounding the accident to the general public and U.S. leaders. We’re confident that Dale’s experience and wisdom will be invaluable to the work of the Special Committee.”

Klein “humbled” by award

McGaffigan

In his remarks accepting the award at the plenary session of the ANS national meeting, Klein said that he grew up on a farm in Missouri and that it was a long way from those humble beginnings to standing on the podium of the ANS meeting. Then Klein said that he was mindful of the comments of a prior recipient of the award, the NRC’s Ed McGaffigan, Jr., who received the same award in 2007 shortly before his untimely death.

Perhaps in a reference to the troubles afflicting the current NRC chairman, Klein said, Ed McGaffigan was noted for respectfully yet forcefully reminding NRC commissioners not to make decisions that could be perceived as political in nature.

“McGaffigan said at his award ceremony that he stood on the shoulders of giants like Smyth, whom the award is named after and I feel the same way,” Klein said.

Career highlights

ANS Nuclear Cafe talked with Klein on the occasion of his award and asked him about some of the highlights of his long career.

The first question is why does the NRC get involved in international nuclear issues, given its primary mandate to regulate the U.S. reactor fleet?

Klein said that the NRC staff and the other commissioners understand that nuclear energy is a global enterprise. A nation’s nuclear agency responsible for the safety of its reactors cannot work in a vacuum. The NRC works closely with the OECD Multi-National Design Evaluation Program (MDEP).

The MDEP program incorporates a broad range of activities including:

  • Enhanced multilateral cooperation within existing regulatory frameworks.
  • Multinational convergence of codes, standards, and safety goals.
  • Implementation of MDEP products to facilitate licensing of new reactors, including those being developed by the Generation IV International Forum.

Setting boundaries that matter

Klein says that it is important to remember that ultimately, the responsibility for the safety of a nuclear reactor rests with the plant operator. He doesn’t think a prescriptive international regulatory body, perhaps housed at the IAEA, would be a good idea.

As a practical matter, though Klein didn’t say so directly, this kind of international cooperation, which the NRC promotes, works to prevent developers of new and untried nuclear technologies from shopping around for the most promising venue.

What he does say is that boundaries matter. He thinks nations should cooperate especially where reactors are near each others’ borders. For instance, rivers divide international boundaries and reactors are often located on major waterways in Europe. For this reason, it makes sense for the nuclear regulatory agencies in both countries to be talking to each other.

Another area where Klein and the NRC saw value in engagement in international venues is with the International Nuclear Regulatory Association (INRA). The main purpose of the association is to influence and enhance nuclear safety, from the regulatory prospective, among its members and worldwide.

It was established in January 1997 and comprises the most senior officials of the nuclear regulatory authorities of the following countries: Canada, France, Germany, Japan, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America.

Fukushima focus?

The big question on everyone’s mind is what does Klein think of the evolving circumstances at Fukushima?

Klein’s observation is that the accident at Fukushima demonstrates that nuclear events are seen by the public differently than coal or natural gas. It’s a reminder that whatever happens at one nuclear power station has worldwide impacts.

Some of the issues that have to be dealt with coming out of Fukushima include:

  • Managing safety and security for multiple reactors at the same site
  • Knowing who is in charge in an emergency
  • Understanding what happens in a beyond design basis event

One of Klein’s observations is that we are early in the process of determining what is a lesson learned from Fukushima.

“We have too much data and not enough information,” Klein said.

However, he added that there are some changes already taking place in Japan that make sense.

“I support Japan’s plan to move the Nuclear Industrial Safety Agency out from under the Trade Ministry to independent status. I support seeing its technical capability to carry out an independent oversight role as an important contribution to Japan’s future use of nuclear energy,” Klein said.

Country-by-country

A good example of the NRC’s work with international regulatory issues is its technical assistance to the nuclear regulatory agency in Spain. The system there is different than the United States because the nuclear regulatory agency makes a technical recommendation to the central government, which then makes a policy decision on whether or not to grant or renew a license for a reactor.

That said, the NRC dispatched its most senior nuclear engineers to Spain while Klein was chairman, including the agency’s executive director who was fluent in Spanish. Klein says that this technical assistance made a difference in the quality of one utility’s efforts to present a strong case for relicensing.

Klein then offered some thoughts on the global nuclear energy renaissance by talking about the situation in several countries.

China: The NRC provided technical support to that country’s nuclear regulatory agency. However, the political environment has unknowns that are difficult to understand from an American perspective.

United Arab Emirates: Klein is the chair the UAE Nuclear Safety Review Board. Bill Travers, who used to hold a high level position at the NRC, leads the nuclear regulatory effort in the UAE. The country’s regulatory framework, with independence from the agency developing four new reactors, is seen as a model for other countries.

India: It turns out that Klein was one of the first senior U.S. officials to travel to India after the signing of the 1-2-3 agreement that allows the country to acquire nuclear fuel for their civilian reactors. Klein notes that India has a well-established nuclear regulatory program that is technically competent.

Germany: Right now, Klein says, there is a lot of emotion coming out in response to the Fukushima crisis. It is not a good time to be making policy decisions. Germany and Switzerland have done exactly that, having made “emotional votes” on nuclear energy.

“These decisions to end their nuclear energy programs are unsustainable. The outcomes will not support meeting climate change objectives. Solar and wind will not support baseload demand,” Klein said.

“I see the Italian vote as a protest against the excesses of the Berlusconi regime and not directed specifically at nuclear energy. Yet, in 1987 when Italy first shut down their nuclear reactors, their energy minister told me it cost the country $50 billion in additional energy costs, something they could ill afford,” he said.

Meanwhile, getting back to Germany, Klein says that they will wind up importing energy to meet baseload demand. That will include gas from Russia and nuclear energy from France and the Czech Republic. When CEZ ramps up the Temelin project ib the Czech Republic, it could result in as many as five new reactors.

Russia: The Russians are pursuing exports of their VVER reactor design with deals in Turkey, India, China, and Vietnam.

“We need to pay more attention to their growing global market share,” Klein said.

Some of Klein’s remarks reported here were also made later in the day at an ANS  special President’s Session on Fukushima. Klein’s role and work as co-chair on the ANS Fukushima Commission will be reported in-depth by ANS Nuclear News.

Who was Henry DeWolf Smyth?

Smyth

Henry DeWolf Smyth (1898-1986) was an American physicist and diplomat who had several key roles in the early development of nuclear energy. He was a commissioner of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (1949-1954) and was the U.S. representative to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) from 1961-1970. He was chairman of the Department of Physics at Princeton University from 1935-1949. His academic advisor for his Ph.D. was Ernest Rutherford.
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Dan Yurman publishes Idaho Samizdat, a blog about nuclear energy, and is a frequent contributor to ANS Nuclear Cafe

Submit nominations now for YMG awards!

By Tim Gnadt

The Young Members Group of the American Nuclear Society is accepting nominations for the two YMG national awards. Each award will be presented at the ANS Winter Conference.

The two awards are the Advancement Award and the Excellence Award.

The Advancement Award is granted to an individual or group who has:

  • Increased membership participation of young members
  • Created leadership or experience opportunities for young members
  • Trained or mentored young members
  • Raised funding for young members
  • Publicly supported the cause of young members
  • Taken other actions to get young members involved with ANS on a national level

Special consideration is given to those whose actions have far-reaching effects, such as influencing a large number of young members or setting a public example for young member outreach.

The Excellence Award recognizes a young member who has demonstrated overall excellence in a variety of areas. It is presented to an individual who:

  • Is a member of the ANS YMG
  • Is involved with ANS on a national level
  • Actively advances the goals of the ANS YMG
  • Displays outstanding non-technical skills as well as technical or managerial ability
  • Is recognized by others in their field
  • Demonstrates high quality and safety standards
  • Positively represents nuclear science and technology to the general population

Continued demonstrations of excellence should be emphasized.

Nominees must be YMG members—less than 36 years old or within five years of graduation at the time of nomination.

Past recipients can be found here.

More information is available at the ANS Web site for the Advancement Award and the Excellence Award, along with nomination forms and instructions.

The deadline for nominations is July 1—make your nomination now!

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Gnadt

Tim Gnadt has been the chair of the YMG Awards and Recognition Committee since January 2011, and a member of the YMG since November 2009. He is active duty in the US Navy and works as an instructor at its prototype training facility in upstate New York.

Nominations for Seaborg Medal due June 1

Established in 1983, the American Nuclear Society’s Seaborg Medal recognizes an individual who has made outstanding scientific or engineering research contributions to the development of peaceful uses of nuclear energy. Nominations for candidates for the award are invited from technical societies, heads of governments, and other appropriate individuals. The deadline for nomination to be received at ANS is June 1, 2011.

Nominees for the Seaborg Medal should reflect a high degree of scientific acumen, imagination,  and unusual talents in scientific research. Candidates should have made significant contributions to the scientific basis for a wide variety of peaceful applications of nuclear technology. Further, candidates should be held in high esteem by peers engaged in the important task of nuclear research.

Nominees need not be ANS members. The recipient must be living at the time he or she is selected. Nomination forms and further information are available from ANS headquarters and at the ANS website.

Nominations open for ANS Young Member awards

Nominations are now being accepted for two American Nuclear Society awards established to recognize the important contributions of young members and the ANS Young Members Group (YMG) to ANS as a whole.  Nominations for the Young Members Advancement Award and the Young Members Excellence Award are due by July 1, 2011.  Each award is presented annually at the ANS Winter Conference.

Advancement award

The Young Members Advancement Award is granted to an individual or a group who has

  • increased membership or participation of young members
  • created leadership or experience opportunities for young members
  • trained or mentored young members
  • raised funding for young members
  • publicly supported the cause of young members, or
  • taken other actions to get young members involved with ANS on a national level

Special consideration is given to those whose actions have far-reaching effects, such as positively influencing large numbers of young members or setting a public example for young member outreach. Past honorees may be found here.

Young Members Advancement Award recipients are selected by the YMG Honors and Awards Committee. Nominees need not be ANS members, ANS-based organizations, or YMG members, but must be living at the time of selection. Further information, including nomination materials and instructions, is available on the ANS website.

Excellence award

Established by the YMG in 2007, the Young Members Excellence Award recognizes a young member who has demonstrated overall excellence in a variety of areas. It is presented annually to an individual who

  • is a member of the ANS Young Members Group
  • is involved with ANS at the national level
  • actively advances the goals of the ANS Young Members Group
  • displays outstanding non-technical skills as well as technical or managerial ability
  • is recognized by others in their field
  • demonstrates high quality and safety standards, and
  • positively represents nuclear science and technology to the general population

Emphasis is placed on well-rounded candidates who demonstrate a history of continuing excellence. The candidate must be under the age of 36 or within five years of graduation at the time of nomination (i.e., fulfilling the ANS definition of “young member”). Past honorees may be found here.

Young Members Excellence Award recipients are selected by the YMG Honors and Awards Committee. Nominees must be members of ANS and YMG. Further information, including nomination materials and instructions, is available on the ANS website.

American Nuclear Society 2011-2012 scholarships available

American Nuclear Society scholarship applications for the 2011-2012 academic year are now online! Since ANS was established in 1954, it has promoted the awareness and understanding of nuclear science and technology (NS&T). To further that mission, ANS administers scholarships each year that support the development and education of those who will research and implement future applications of NS&T.

More than 20 scholarships named after pioneers and leaders in NS&T are awarded each year by ANS, along with some general scholarships,to students with outstanding academic credentials. Special scholarships are also available to students in economic need.

Some scholarships are available for students entering their sophomore year and beyond in college, while others are for incoming freshmen.

The deadline for submitting scholarship applications is February 1, 2011 (April 1 for the Incoming Freshman Scholarship). Scholarship descriptions, guidelines, and requirements may be found here, and applications are available for downloading here.

2011 ANS Special Award announced

Happy Thanksgiving! The topic for the American Nuclear Society’s Special Award in 2011 is “Innovations in Small Modular Reactors.”

The Special Award was established in 1962 by ANS to recognize individuals for meritorious contributions in research and/or developing understanding into the important areas of the selected topic. A different topic is chosen each year by the ANS Board of Directors based on recommendations from the society’s Honors and Awards Committee. Each topic is selected based on its importance to the peaceful applications of nuclear technology to mankind.

The award is intended to go to an individual, or individuals, rather than to a large group or institution. The candidate/s for the award should have played an outstanding role in the necessary research and analysis and/or in the interpretation and leadership associated with furthering the overall understanding of the topic. Nominees must be living, but need not be ANS members.

Nomination forms are available at the ANS Web site or from ANS Headquarters. Eight copies of the completed form and supporting materials must be received at ANS headquarters before April 1, 2011.

Plaques and a monetary award totaling $1000 will be presented to a winning individual or team at an ANS Annual Meeting in 2011.