Category Archives: Carnival of nuclear bloggers

Nuclear Energy Blog Carnival 221

ferris wheel 202x201It’s time for the 221st edition of the Carnival of Nuclear Bloggers and Authors.  This event circulates among the top pro-nuclear blogs, and each week highlights those items submitted to the host as most important or most timely.  Of course, every week, there is a post made right here at ANS Nuclear Cafe to direct you to the Carnival – but on a rotating basis we host it here, and this week is one of those occasions.  Let’s go in!

Forbes – Jim Conca

Extinction by Traditional Chinese Medicine

An epidemic of poaching is sweeping over Africa, paid for by Chinese and other Asians, fueled by the growing energy production from coal.  Caught up in this frenzy of rituals are animals like the rhinoceros, which may not be long for the world.

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Nuke Power Talk – Gail Marcus

Energy Policy and Disruption: Managing Change

This week, Gail Marcus follows up on a previous post about the impacts of the evolution of energy technologies and takes the discussion a few steps further.  In addition to the always present tendency to protect existing jobs, she points to a study by the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) that shows that mining and related activities are a significant part of the economies of several states in the US.  She notes that this fact creates an additional dimension to the problem – it’s not just replacing one job with another one if the jobs are in different places – and comments on how states might proactively face such changes.

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NewsOK – Robert Hayes

Radioactive Materials in the Oilfield

Oilfield work involves long hours and back-breaking work.  It also involves radioactive material in many ways, including natural radioactivity and man-made radionuclides used in a number of specific ways.

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Yes Vermont Yankee – Meredith Angwin / guest post by George Coppenrath

New England Energy: What were they thinking?

George Coppenrath, a Vermont state senator who served on the Natural Resources and Energy Committee, wrote this guest post.  He wonders what Vermont energy planners were thinking; did they think that closing Vermont Yankee would push energy production to wind and solar?  Did they think natural gas would be inexpensive forever? It looks like they were wrong.

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NEI Nuclear Notes – submitted by Eric McErlain (various authors)

US Technology Exports and Africa:  A delegation from Niger, South Africa and Namibia visited NEI on August 7th to see how peaceful commercial nuclear technology could be exported to those countries.

In a Pit in a Nuclear Free Vermont:  A series of bad choices when it comes to energy policy has led Vermont down a blind alley.

Transatomic Power snags $2 million Investment:  The Founders Fund, a group that provided seed money for Facebook and other Silicon Valley start-ups, has made a $2 million investment in Transatomic Power.

What It Takes to Become an Operations Shift Manager:  Megan Wilson at PG&E talks about what it takes to move up the ladder at California’s only nuclear plant.

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Next Big Future – Brian Wang

India needs to expand nuclear; HTGR in works

India needs to both expand its power system to serve 300 million people, as well as move away from coal fired generation assets.  Nuclear power would, potentially, grow 15 times faster here than other assets.  Also, a piece on shared development of HTGR’s between Japan and Indonesia.

Cameco on track; Cameco’s production target not impacted by process changes.

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Atomic Insights – Rod Adams (guest post by Bill Sacks / Greg Myerson)

Why Does Conventional Wisdom Ignore Hormesis?

In light of repeated assertions that all ionizing radiation is harmful no matter how high or how low the dose, the existence of a beneficial health effect may be surprising.  But nearly a century of laboratory experimentation and epidemiological observation of both humans and animals supports the protective response region and contradicts the conventional wisdom.  Why then does the concept that all ionizing radiation is harmful hang on with such tenacity, and how did it gain a foothold against all evidence to the contrary?

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The Hiroshima Syndrome – Les Corrice

Did Fukushima Daiichi Unit 3 have a “melt through?”

TEPCO says the Unit 3 core may have completely melted and most of it might be embedded in the basemat under the reactor.  The company cautions that their analysis “entails some degree of uncertainty.”  Their degree of uncertainty might be substantial.

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Canadian Energy Issues – Steve Aplin

Fighting darkness and steel with carbide, and carbon with nuclear energy; Canada’s revolutionary past, present and future

What does calcium carbide have to do with nuclear energy?  Steve Aplin of Canadian Energy Issues remembers his spelunking days and their connection to the Second Industrial Revolution.

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That’s it for this week’s entries!  Thanks to all of our submitters, and authors.

Nuclear Energy Blog Carnival 220

ferris wheel 202x201The 220th edition of the Carnival of Nuclear Bloggers and Authors has been posted at Next Big Future.  You can click here to access this latest installment of a long running tradition among pro-nuclear authors and bloggers.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance, improved health, and broadened security through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, Thorium MSR and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Nuclear Energy Blog Carnival 219

ferris wheel 202x201The 219th edition of the Carnival of Nuclear Bloggers and Authors has been posted at The Hiroshima Syndrome.  You can click here to access this latest installment of a long running tradition among pro-nuclear authors and bloggers.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance, improved health, and broadened security through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, Thorium MSR and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Nuclear Energy Blog Carnival 216

ferris wheel 202x201The 216th edition of the Carnival of Nuclear Bloggers and Authors is posted at Next Big Future.  You can click here to view this latest installment of a long running tradition among pro-nuclear authors and bloggers.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance, improved health, and broadened security through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, Thorium MSR and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Nuclear Energy Blogger Carnival 214

ferriswheel 201x268The 214th Carnival of Nuclear Energy Bloggers has been posted at Atomic Power Review.  You can click here to access this latest edition of a long-standing tradition.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance, improved health, and broadened security through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, Thorium MSR and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Nuclear Energy Blogger and Author Carnival 213

ferris wheel 202x201It’s time for the 213th Carnival of Nuclear Energy Bloggers and Authors, hosted this week right here at the ANS Nuclear Cafe.  It’s a big week for ANS, with the Annual Meeting going on in Reno… so without any further remarks we’ll dive right in!

 

NewsOK / Robert Bruce Hayes

Beware of Junk Science  -  Robert Hayes reminds us that it’s possible to become afraid of something we don’t really understand, based upon selected facts we’re told to cloud or steer an issue.

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Atomic Insights – Rod Adams

Radiation Health Effects for Medical Doctors

Misinformation about radiation health effects does not just affect the nuclear industry and dramatically increase the costs associated with all nuclear energy technologies. It is also having a deleterious effect on the beneficial use of radiation and radioactive materials in medical diagnosis and treatment.


Throughout their training programs, medical doctors have been taught to do everything they can to minimize radiation exposure. This message has become so intense in recent decades that many medical professionals shy away from ordering tests that would help them do their jobs better and provide better patient outcomes.

Atomic Show #216 – Just The Fracks, Ma’am

Greg Kozera is President of the Virginia Oil and Gas Association and is the author of a recently released book entitled “Just the Fracks, Ma’am; The Truth About Hydrofracking and the Next Great American Boom.”  Kozera and Rod Adams discuss energy options, the value of natural gas as a feedstock for material production, and the actions of certain members of the natural gas industry to discourage competitors like coal and nuclear.

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Nuke Power Talk / Gail Marcus

Nuclear Engineering Students Among “Most Impressive” at MIT

Gail Marcus was pleased and proud to discover that three nuclear engineering students were profiled in a group of only fourteen students identified as among the most outstanding at MIT last year.  She notes in Nuke Power Talk that this is an impressively high percentage in an already elite group, and she considers this a very positive sign for the future of the nuclear industry.

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Forbes / Jim Conca

EPA Hits Nuclear Industry with Kryptonite

EPA’s latest proposed emissions rule for nuclear power plants focuses on a non-issue that has never been a problem; Kr-85.  Kr-85 is a noble gas that cannot react with anything, can’t form chemical compounds or even individual molecules, and can’t enter biological pathways.  Kr-85 can’t do anything but dissipate immediately upon leaving the reactor.

Why on Earth is China Nervous about Plutonium in Japan?

China is nervous about Japan making atomic weapons and has complained to the International Atomic Energy Agency that Japan has over 1,400 pounds of plutonium that it did not report.  This is actually amusing since this Pu cannot be made into weapons.  Also funny is China’s faked outrage.

 

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Next Big Future / Brian Wang

China could complete 9 nuclear reactors in the next 7 months

By the end of 2014, the number of reactors in the country is expected
reach 30, bringing the total nuclear capacity to around 27 GWe. In
2015, capacity should reach 36 GWe, as a further eight reactors are
brought online. 18 units are expected to start up within the next two
years, taking nuclear capacity close to the projected 40 GWe figure.

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ANS Nuclear Cafe – submitted by Paul Bowersox

Spent Fuel Pool Fire Risk Drops to Zero Months After Shutdown

Rod Adams addresses the real issues that concern operation and maintenance of spent fuel pools at nuclear power plants in this thorough article.  The constant effort on the part of some anti-nuclear activists to make spent fuel pools into a looming threat is dispatched in detail; the realities are presented so that actual risk may be perceived, and once understood, placed in perspective.

Pathfinder – A Path Not Taken

Will Davis presents a history of one of the most unusual commercial nuclear power plants ever built – a boiling water reactor capable of producing highly superheated steam.  The reasons for its failure are explored, as is some not-before-seen history.  For those interested in placing SMR’s at existing power plant sites, this post might be quite interesting – and important.

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That’s it for this week’s posts.  Thanks to all of our contributors!

Nuclear Energy Bloggers’ Carnival, edition 212

carnivalThere is a lot going on in nuclear energy lately—and a correspondingly sizable haul of contributions by the internet’s nuclear bloggers this week, posted at Next Big Future.  A new US EPA rule on power plant carbon emissions figures prominently.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance, improved health, and broadened security through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, Thorium MSR and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Nuclear Energy Blogger Carnival 211

ferris wheel 202x201The 211th Carnival of Nuclear Energy Bloggers and Authors has been posted at The Hiroshima Syndrome.  You can click here to access this latest entry in a long running tradition among the top English language pro-nuclear bloggers and authors.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance, improved health, and broadened security through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, Thorium MSR and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Nuclear Energy Blog Carnival edition 209

The 209th Nuclear Energy Blog Carnival: Nuclear Energy In Perspective

Perspectives on the ongoing value of existing nuclear plants, perspectives on the future of nuclear energy, WIPP radiation in perspective, perspectives of women in the nuclear industry, Fukushima FUD-fighting, and more… pay a visit and check out opinions and commentary by those “in the know.”

The 209th Nuclear Energy Blog Carnival is posted at Yes Vermont Yankee.  You can click here to access this latest post in a long running tradition among the top English language nuclear bloggers and authors.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance, improved health, and broadened security through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, Thorium MSR and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

carnival 201x201

 

 

Nuclear Energy Blogger Carnival 208

ferriswheel 201x268It’s time for the 208th Carnival of Nuclear Energy, and ANS Nuclear Cafe is proud to host the event!

Every week, the top English-language pro-nuclear bloggers and authors get together to present their top stories of that week.  That means that by following the Carnival wherever it goes, you can stay on top of the most important stories, issues and concerns.  Let’s see this week’s!

Forbes – Jim Conca

Nuclear Waste Leak Traced To…  Kitty Litter?

The recent news of a radioactive waste incident at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant has now been tempered by the revelation that an attempt to “go green” may have been responsible for the leak.  Jim Conca explains.

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Next Big Future – Brian Wang

Nuclear power makes up 60% of the power that does not emit carbon dioxide

http://nextbigfuture.com/2014/05/nuclear-power-in-us-makes-up-60-of.html

Time, Distance and Shielding - Radiation protection factors of
buildings are like the SPF of sunscreen

http://nextbigfuture.com/2014/05/time-distance-and-shielding-and.html

Help fund this project and have a chance to shock the world with
massively lower energy costs.

http://nextbigfuture.com/2014/05/this-project-could-reduce-energy-costs.html

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The Hiroshima Syndrome - Les Corrice

The “Fall Back” for Japan’s Press on a Slow Fukushima News Week

It’s been a relatively slow week for negative Fukushima news reporting. But, the Press can always fall back on the exploitation of the angry…the frightened…the uncertain…the doubtful. The Japan Times has done just that.

http://www.hiroshimasyndrome.com/fukushima-commentary.html

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ANS Nuclear Cafe

Save Vermont Yankee – If Not You, Who?  If Not Now, When?

There is a safe, reliable, 650 MWe power plant with a low, predictable fuel cost – pending closing in Vermont.  Recently extensively refurbished, in a region with very tight generating capacity.  Licensed to operate through 2032.  Rod Adams notes that mothballing a plant like this seems insane, and asks if there’s a way to prevent it.

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Yes Vermont Yankee – Meredith Angwin

With Vermont Yankee scheduled to close, Meredith Angwin at Yes Vermont Yankee has two posts about a possible employee buyout.  Such a buyout was proposed by Rod Adams. In Saving Vermont Yankee: Rod Adams Moves Forward,
http://yesvy.blogspot.com/2014/05/saving-vermont-yankee-rod-adams-moves.html#.U20CjSiTT9Q, Angwin has an upbeat description of Adams work and plans for such a buyout.
In Employee Ownership
http://yesvy.blogspot.com/2014/05/employee-ownership.html#.U20C6SiTT9Q Angwin describes the financial and political issues that oppose such a plan.   The truth is probably somewhere between these two posts!

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Atomic Insights – Rod Adams

B&W mPower cover story about lack of interest is bogus

During a call with investors, Jim Ferland, the company CEO announced that spending on the mPower reactor development project would be slashed by approximately 75%. The official explanation was that the company had failed in its effort to find major investors. The underlying impression given, perhaps purposely, was that SMRs were not attracting customer interest and were thus just an expensive distraction to keep nuclear-focused development teams busy.

That cover story leaves out a lot of details. Rod Adams fills in some of the missing details of a developing story.

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Nuke Power Talk – Gail Marcus

Food Irradiation

Gail Marcus provides some updates on the food irradiation issue at Nuke Power Talk.  She makes note of both the good news (the recent approval for the irradiation of crustaceans), and the bad news (the length of time it took to obtain that approval and the continuing opposition to food irradiation).  She also draws analogies with the acceptance of pasteurization of milk a century ago, and shares her discovery of a retail source for irradiated ground beef.

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That’s it for this week’s Carnival.  Thanks to all of our contributors!

Nuclear Energy Blogger Carnival 207

ferris wheel 202x201The 207th Carnival of Nuclear Energy has been posted at Next Big Future.  You can click here to access this latest post in a long running tradition among the top English language pro-nuclear bloggers and authors.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance, improved health, and broadened security through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, Thorium MSR and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Nuclear Energy Blogger Carnival 206

ferris wheel 202x201The 206th Carnival of Nuclear Energy has been posted at The Hiroshima Syndrome.  You can click here to access this latest post in a long running tradition among the top English language pro-nuclear bloggers and authors.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance, improved health, and broadened security through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, Thorium MSR and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Nuclear Energy Blogger Carnival 205

ferris wheel 202x201The 205th Carnival of Nuclear Energy has been posted at Atomic Power Review.  You can click here to access the latest post in a long running tradition among the top English language pro-nuclear bloggers and authors.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance, improved health, and broadened security through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, Thorium MSR and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Nuclear Energy Blogger Carnival 204

ferris wheel 202x201It’s time for the 204th Carnival of Nuclear Energy Bloggers and Authors – and this week, it’s hosted right here at the ANS Nuclear Cafe.  The best pro-nuclear authors and bloggers have lined up to submit their choices for this week’s compilation.

 

NEI Nuclear Notes – submitted by Eric McErlain

Why DOE Should Back SMR Development

Energy Northwest VP Dale Atkinson on why his company is pursuing SMR’s

NEI’s Ted Jones lists the top 5 reasons to support reauthorization of the Ex-Im Bank – something critical for the US nuclear industry

FirstEnergy’s Tony Alexander doesn’t like what’s happening to the grid

Popular Mechanics just published an expose on Joe Mangano.  Are reporters listening?

NEI’s Tara Young watched the first episode of Showtime’s documentary series on climate change, but didn’t hear anything about energy solutions.

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Yes Vermont Yankee – Meredith Angwin

Predicting the 60 Minutes Fukushima Story: Guest post by James Greenidge

This guest post was written as a comment on another blog, shortly before the 60 Minutes ”third anniversary of Fukushima” television segment was broadcast.  In the post, Greenidge predicts that desolate towns and earthquake-induced natural gas fires will be featured on 60 Minutes.  Comparative background radiation levels will not be featured. Was he correct?

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AREVA North America Next Energy Blog

Nuclear Components Riding the Bull for Seismic Testing

As part of the response to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s post-Fukushima requirements, companies that operate nuclear energy facilities are re-evaluating the earthquake potential at their sites using the latest data and methodologies.  Surviving the up to 20 g bull ride atop AREVA’s 7-ton shake table is one way to test safety-related components, and help U.S. nuclear power facilities remain a safe, reliable and bountiful clean energy source of electricity to power America’s industry, hospitals and homes.

AREVA Inc’s Rencheck:  Nuclear Energy Crucial to New England

With our need for energy growing, not just during cold weather snaps, we need a reliable, diverse energy mix that prioritizes low-carbon energy sources to improve public health and reduce emissions.  Nuclear energy currently accounts for approximately 20 percent of U.S. electricity and 63.3 percent of emissions-free electricity.  Increased energy grid stability and reliability are some of the more well-known benefits of nuclear energy, but its positive contributions to public health are too often overlooked.

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Atomic Insights – Rod Adams

TMI Operators Took Actions They Were Trained to Take

This is a guest article by Michael Derivan who was the Davis Besse shift supervisor on September 24, 1977 when the plant experienced an event that was almost identical to the event that resulted in the TMI core melt accident. For the first 20 minutes, the Davis Besse plant and operator responses were almost identical to those at TMI. Then Derivan had an ah-ha moment and turned his event into an historic footnote instead of a multi-billion dollar accident.

In this lengthy, carefully explained piece, Derivan tells why his plant and his crew responded to a loss of feed water event in the same way that the TMI plant and crew responded 18 months later. He wonders why the lessons learned from his event were not shared with the TMI operators sometime during interval before their accident and why the subsequent investigations did not reveal the true root cause.

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ANS Nuclear Cafe

Kenya’s Studied Approach to a Nuclear Future

Will Davis takes a look at the program being developed by the Kenya Nuclear Electricity Board, its history and its effort to have its core of nuclear engineers and experts educated overseas to seed the program in future years.

Small Modular Reactors – U.S. Capabilities and the Global Market

Rod Adams recently attended the Nuclear Energy Insider SMR conference, and at ANS Nuclear Cafe he reports on the events of the second day of that conference which focused on information for those interested in developing a market for such plants outside the U.S.

A Pyrrhic Victory In Vermont for Nuclear Power?

Howard Shaffer continues the long-standing ANS Nuclear Cafe coverage on events surrounding the Vermont Yankee plant with this piece which describes the recent Vermont Public Service Board’s issuance of a Certificate of Public Good for the plant.  Important facts for nuclear advocates – as well as great motivation – can be found in this article.

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The Hiroshima Syndrome – Les Corrice

Arnie Gundersen’s Fukushima hot particle myth

Arnie Gundersen is making a concerted effort to have the world think that hot particles also come from nuke plants, especially Fukushima Daiichi. His latest “evidence” comes from a professional civil engineer in Massachusetts who has been trying for three years to use this contrived hot particle notion as a basis for getting a PhD…without success. Further, Gundersen makes one of the most convoluted conspiracy theory claims to yet come out of the Fukushima realm of distorted journalism.

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Next Big Future – Brian Wang

Here are details on the General Atomics (GA) Energy Multiplier Module
(EM²) reactor.

GA is innovating new materials, getting the efficiency way up,
simplifying the design and getting the cost into the competitive
range.

GA is developing a Brayton cycle to convert heat to electricity at 53%
versus 28 to 34 percent for regular steam turbines. In a four-module
plant (1.06GW), one point of efficiency is worth a billion dollars in
revenue over the life of the plant. 53% efficiency means $19 billion
dollars more than a 34% efficient plant.

GA’s design is a 265-megawatt (electric) sized reactor, with a fuel
cycle lifetime of 30-plus years.

General Fusion

Possibly later this year, General Fusion will begin work on a
full-size prototype reactor. At the center will be a sphere, three
meters in diameter, inside which molten lead swirls at high speed
creating a vacuum, or vortex, in the middle. Arrayed around it will be
200 to 300 pistons, each the size of a cannon. Firing in perfect
harmony, they will create an acoustic wave that collapses the vortex
at the very moment a plasma injector shoots hydrogen isotopes, the
nuclear fuel, into it. If General Fusion has its physics right, the
heat and pressure will ignite a fusion reaction that spins off
countless neutrons which will heat the lead even more. Pumped through
a heat exchanger, that hot lead will help generate steam just like a
conventional thermal power plant.

HTR-PM High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

The pouring of concrete for the basemat of the first HTR-PM unit – a
demonstration high-temperature gas-cooled reactor – at Shidaowan in
China’s Shandong province was recently completed. Another 19 of the
small modular reactors could follow.

HTR-PM are modular reactors that will be mainly factory mass-produced.
The first one is taking 5 years to make. The reactor module will head
towards about two years to build when they are making them by the
dozen.

The demonstration plant’s twin HTR-PM units will drive a single 210
MWe turbine. It is expected to begin operating around 2017. Eighteen
further units are proposed for the Shidaowan site, near Rongcheng in
Weihai city.

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Nuke Power Talk – Gail Marcus

External Hazards at Nuclear Power Plants: A New Study

Gail Marcus describes a recent IAEA study on the risks of external events at nuclear power plants.  She summarizes the major findings of the report, and notes that, in many cases, corrective actions have already been taken to address some of the plant vulnerabilities.

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That’s it for this week’s entries.  Thank you to all of our authors and to those who selected pieces for submission!

 

Nuclear Energy Blogger Carnival 203

ferris wheel 202x201The 203rd Nuclear Energy Blogger Carnival has been posted at Thorium MSR.  You can click here to see this latest installment in a long running tradition among the top English language pro-nuclear bloggers and authors.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance, improved health, and broadened security through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.