Category Archives: Carnival of nuclear bloggers

Nuclear Energy Bloggers’ Carnival, edition 212

carnivalThere is a lot going on in nuclear energy lately—and a correspondingly sizable haul of contributions by the internet’s nuclear bloggers this week, posted at Next Big Future.  A new US EPA rule on power plant carbon emissions figures prominently.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance, improved health, and broadened security through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, Thorium MSR and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Nuclear Energy Blogger Carnival 211

ferris wheel 202x201The 211th Carnival of Nuclear Energy Bloggers and Authors has been posted at The Hiroshima Syndrome.  You can click here to access this latest entry in a long running tradition among the top English language pro-nuclear bloggers and authors.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance, improved health, and broadened security through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, Thorium MSR and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Nuclear Energy Blog Carnival edition 209

The 209th Nuclear Energy Blog Carnival: Nuclear Energy In Perspective

Perspectives on the ongoing value of existing nuclear plants, perspectives on the future of nuclear energy, WIPP radiation in perspective, perspectives of women in the nuclear industry, Fukushima FUD-fighting, and more… pay a visit and check out opinions and commentary by those “in the know.”

The 209th Nuclear Energy Blog Carnival is posted at Yes Vermont Yankee.  You can click here to access this latest post in a long running tradition among the top English language nuclear bloggers and authors.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance, improved health, and broadened security through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, Thorium MSR and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

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Nuclear Energy Blogger Carnival 208

ferriswheel 201x268It’s time for the 208th Carnival of Nuclear Energy, and ANS Nuclear Cafe is proud to host the event!

Every week, the top English-language pro-nuclear bloggers and authors get together to present their top stories of that week.  That means that by following the Carnival wherever it goes, you can stay on top of the most important stories, issues and concerns.  Let’s see this week’s!

Forbes – Jim Conca

Nuclear Waste Leak Traced To…  Kitty Litter?

The recent news of a radioactive waste incident at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant has now been tempered by the revelation that an attempt to “go green” may have been responsible for the leak.  Jim Conca explains.

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Next Big Future – Brian Wang

Nuclear power makes up 60% of the power that does not emit carbon dioxide

http://nextbigfuture.com/2014/05/nuclear-power-in-us-makes-up-60-of.html

Time, Distance and Shielding – Radiation protection factors of
buildings are like the SPF of sunscreen

http://nextbigfuture.com/2014/05/time-distance-and-shielding-and.html

Help fund this project and have a chance to shock the world with
massively lower energy costs.

http://nextbigfuture.com/2014/05/this-project-could-reduce-energy-costs.html

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The Hiroshima Syndrome – Les Corrice

The “Fall Back” for Japan’s Press on a Slow Fukushima News Week

It’s been a relatively slow week for negative Fukushima news reporting. But, the Press can always fall back on the exploitation of the angry…the frightened…the uncertain…the doubtful. The Japan Times has done just that.

http://www.hiroshimasyndrome.com/fukushima-commentary.html

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ANS Nuclear Cafe

Save Vermont Yankee – If Not You, Who?  If Not Now, When?

There is a safe, reliable, 650 MWe power plant with a low, predictable fuel cost – pending closing in Vermont.  Recently extensively refurbished, in a region with very tight generating capacity.  Licensed to operate through 2032.  Rod Adams notes that mothballing a plant like this seems insane, and asks if there’s a way to prevent it.

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Yes Vermont Yankee – Meredith Angwin

With Vermont Yankee scheduled to close, Meredith Angwin at Yes Vermont Yankee has two posts about a possible employee buyout.  Such a buyout was proposed by Rod Adams. In Saving Vermont Yankee: Rod Adams Moves Forward,
http://yesvy.blogspot.com/2014/05/saving-vermont-yankee-rod-adams-moves.html#.U20CjSiTT9Q, Angwin has an upbeat description of Adams work and plans for such a buyout.
In Employee Ownership
http://yesvy.blogspot.com/2014/05/employee-ownership.html#.U20C6SiTT9Q Angwin describes the financial and political issues that oppose such a plan.   The truth is probably somewhere between these two posts!

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Atomic Insights – Rod Adams

B&W mPower cover story about lack of interest is bogus

During a call with investors, Jim Ferland, the company CEO announced that spending on the mPower reactor development project would be slashed by approximately 75%. The official explanation was that the company had failed in its effort to find major investors. The underlying impression given, perhaps purposely, was that SMRs were not attracting customer interest and were thus just an expensive distraction to keep nuclear-focused development teams busy.

That cover story leaves out a lot of details. Rod Adams fills in some of the missing details of a developing story.

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Nuke Power Talk – Gail Marcus

Food Irradiation

Gail Marcus provides some updates on the food irradiation issue at Nuke Power Talk.  She makes note of both the good news (the recent approval for the irradiation of crustaceans), and the bad news (the length of time it took to obtain that approval and the continuing opposition to food irradiation).  She also draws analogies with the acceptance of pasteurization of milk a century ago, and shares her discovery of a retail source for irradiated ground beef.

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That’s it for this week’s Carnival.  Thanks to all of our contributors!

Nuclear Energy Blogger Carnival 207

ferris wheel 202x201The 207th Carnival of Nuclear Energy has been posted at Next Big Future.  You can click here to access this latest post in a long running tradition among the top English language pro-nuclear bloggers and authors.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance, improved health, and broadened security through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, Thorium MSR and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Nuclear Energy Blogger Carnival 206

ferris wheel 202x201The 206th Carnival of Nuclear Energy has been posted at The Hiroshima Syndrome.  You can click here to access this latest post in a long running tradition among the top English language pro-nuclear bloggers and authors.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance, improved health, and broadened security through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, Thorium MSR and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Nuclear Energy Blogger Carnival 205

ferris wheel 202x201The 205th Carnival of Nuclear Energy has been posted at Atomic Power Review.  You can click here to access the latest post in a long running tradition among the top English language pro-nuclear bloggers and authors.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance, improved health, and broadened security through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, Thorium MSR and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Nuclear Energy Blogger Carnival 204

ferris wheel 202x201It’s time for the 204th Carnival of Nuclear Energy Bloggers and Authors – and this week, it’s hosted right here at the ANS Nuclear Cafe.  The best pro-nuclear authors and bloggers have lined up to submit their choices for this week’s compilation.

 

NEI Nuclear Notes – submitted by Eric McErlain

Why DOE Should Back SMR Development

Energy Northwest VP Dale Atkinson on why his company is pursuing SMR’s

NEI’s Ted Jones lists the top 5 reasons to support reauthorization of the Ex-Im Bank – something critical for the US nuclear industry

FirstEnergy’s Tony Alexander doesn’t like what’s happening to the grid

Popular Mechanics just published an expose on Joe Mangano.  Are reporters listening?

NEI’s Tara Young watched the first episode of Showtime’s documentary series on climate change, but didn’t hear anything about energy solutions.

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Yes Vermont Yankee – Meredith Angwin

Predicting the 60 Minutes Fukushima Story: Guest post by James Greenidge

This guest post was written as a comment on another blog, shortly before the 60 Minutes “third anniversary of Fukushima” television segment was broadcast.  In the post, Greenidge predicts that desolate towns and earthquake-induced natural gas fires will be featured on 60 Minutes.  Comparative background radiation levels will not be featured. Was he correct?

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AREVA North America Next Energy Blog

Nuclear Components Riding the Bull for Seismic Testing

As part of the response to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s post-Fukushima requirements, companies that operate nuclear energy facilities are re-evaluating the earthquake potential at their sites using the latest data and methodologies.  Surviving the up to 20 g bull ride atop AREVA’s 7-ton shake table is one way to test safety-related components, and help U.S. nuclear power facilities remain a safe, reliable and bountiful clean energy source of electricity to power America’s industry, hospitals and homes.

AREVA Inc’s Rencheck:  Nuclear Energy Crucial to New England

With our need for energy growing, not just during cold weather snaps, we need a reliable, diverse energy mix that prioritizes low-carbon energy sources to improve public health and reduce emissions.  Nuclear energy currently accounts for approximately 20 percent of U.S. electricity and 63.3 percent of emissions-free electricity.  Increased energy grid stability and reliability are some of the more well-known benefits of nuclear energy, but its positive contributions to public health are too often overlooked.

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Atomic Insights – Rod Adams

TMI Operators Took Actions They Were Trained to Take

This is a guest article by Michael Derivan who was the Davis Besse shift supervisor on September 24, 1977 when the plant experienced an event that was almost identical to the event that resulted in the TMI core melt accident. For the first 20 minutes, the Davis Besse plant and operator responses were almost identical to those at TMI. Then Derivan had an ah-ha moment and turned his event into an historic footnote instead of a multi-billion dollar accident.

In this lengthy, carefully explained piece, Derivan tells why his plant and his crew responded to a loss of feed water event in the same way that the TMI plant and crew responded 18 months later. He wonders why the lessons learned from his event were not shared with the TMI operators sometime during interval before their accident and why the subsequent investigations did not reveal the true root cause.

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ANS Nuclear Cafe

Kenya’s Studied Approach to a Nuclear Future

Will Davis takes a look at the program being developed by the Kenya Nuclear Electricity Board, its history and its effort to have its core of nuclear engineers and experts educated overseas to seed the program in future years.

Small Modular Reactors – U.S. Capabilities and the Global Market

Rod Adams recently attended the Nuclear Energy Insider SMR conference, and at ANS Nuclear Cafe he reports on the events of the second day of that conference which focused on information for those interested in developing a market for such plants outside the U.S.

A Pyrrhic Victory In Vermont for Nuclear Power?

Howard Shaffer continues the long-standing ANS Nuclear Cafe coverage on events surrounding the Vermont Yankee plant with this piece which describes the recent Vermont Public Service Board’s issuance of a Certificate of Public Good for the plant.  Important facts for nuclear advocates – as well as great motivation – can be found in this article.

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The Hiroshima Syndrome – Les Corrice

Arnie Gundersen’s Fukushima hot particle myth

Arnie Gundersen is making a concerted effort to have the world think that hot particles also come from nuke plants, especially Fukushima Daiichi. His latest “evidence” comes from a professional civil engineer in Massachusetts who has been trying for three years to use this contrived hot particle notion as a basis for getting a PhD…without success. Further, Gundersen makes one of the most convoluted conspiracy theory claims to yet come out of the Fukushima realm of distorted journalism.

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Next Big Future – Brian Wang

Here are details on the General Atomics (GA) Energy Multiplier Module
(EM²) reactor.

GA is innovating new materials, getting the efficiency way up,
simplifying the design and getting the cost into the competitive
range.

GA is developing a Brayton cycle to convert heat to electricity at 53%
versus 28 to 34 percent for regular steam turbines. In a four-module
plant (1.06GW), one point of efficiency is worth a billion dollars in
revenue over the life of the plant. 53% efficiency means $19 billion
dollars more than a 34% efficient plant.

GA’s design is a 265-megawatt (electric) sized reactor, with a fuel
cycle lifetime of 30-plus years.

General Fusion

Possibly later this year, General Fusion will begin work on a
full-size prototype reactor. At the center will be a sphere, three
meters in diameter, inside which molten lead swirls at high speed
creating a vacuum, or vortex, in the middle. Arrayed around it will be
200 to 300 pistons, each the size of a cannon. Firing in perfect
harmony, they will create an acoustic wave that collapses the vortex
at the very moment a plasma injector shoots hydrogen isotopes, the
nuclear fuel, into it. If General Fusion has its physics right, the
heat and pressure will ignite a fusion reaction that spins off
countless neutrons which will heat the lead even more. Pumped through
a heat exchanger, that hot lead will help generate steam just like a
conventional thermal power plant.

HTR-PM High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

The pouring of concrete for the basemat of the first HTR-PM unit – a
demonstration high-temperature gas-cooled reactor – at Shidaowan in
China’s Shandong province was recently completed. Another 19 of the
small modular reactors could follow.

HTR-PM are modular reactors that will be mainly factory mass-produced.
The first one is taking 5 years to make. The reactor module will head
towards about two years to build when they are making them by the
dozen.

The demonstration plant’s twin HTR-PM units will drive a single 210
MWe turbine. It is expected to begin operating around 2017. Eighteen
further units are proposed for the Shidaowan site, near Rongcheng in
Weihai city.

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Nuke Power Talk – Gail Marcus

External Hazards at Nuclear Power Plants: A New Study

Gail Marcus describes a recent IAEA study on the risks of external events at nuclear power plants.  She summarizes the major findings of the report, and notes that, in many cases, corrective actions have already been taken to address some of the plant vulnerabilities.

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That’s it for this week’s entries.  Thank you to all of our authors and to those who selected pieces for submission!

 

Nuclear Energy Blogger Carnival 203

ferris wheel 202x201The 203rd Nuclear Energy Blogger Carnival has been posted at Thorium MSR.  You can click here to see this latest installment in a long running tradition among the top English language pro-nuclear bloggers and authors.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance, improved health, and broadened security through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Nuclear Energy Blogger Carnival 200

ferris wheel 202x201The 200th Nuclear Energy Blogger Carnival has been posted at Atomic Power Review.  You can click here to see the latest installment in a long running tradition among the top English language pro-nuclear bloggers and authors.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance, improved health, and broadened security through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Nuclear Energy Blogger Carnival 199

ferris wheel 202x201ANS Nuclear Cafe is proud to host the 199th edition of the Nuclear Energy Blogger Carnival – a long standing tradition among the top English-language pro-nuclear bloggers and authors.  The top news and views of the week appear in a rotating fashion each week at one of the top pro-nuclear blogs.  With that, let’s get to the entries from this week.

Atomic Insights – Rod Adams

Smoking Gun – Antinuclear Talking Points Coined by Coal Interests

Some of the earliest documented instances of opposition to the development of commercial nuclear power in the United States originated from designated representatives of the coal industry. They were the first people to mount sustained opposition to the use of taxpayer money to support the development of nuclear power stations.

They testified against the implied subsidy associated with nuclear fuel leasing and complained about the value credited to commercial plant operators for the plutonium produced during operation, even though that material was locked up inside used fuel rods. They were the first people to label the Price-Anderson nuclear liability limitations as a subsidy.

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Nuke Power Talk – Gail Marcus

Energy Diversity – A Discussion on Capital Hill

At Nuke Power Talk, Gail Marcus reports that she participated in a session on Capitol Hill on the subject of energy diversity, along with Dr. Pete Lyons, the Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy.  The meeting was cohosted by the Global America Business Institute (GABI) and the Korea Economic Institute of America (KEI).  Lee Terry, a Congressman from Nebraska and Chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power, opened the proceedings.  He pointed out that his committee dealt with all forms of energy and he was convinced we needed them all.  Dr. Lyons provided an overview of the work of his office, and Gail covered some of the unique contributions that nuclear energy makes.  Gail also quoted a recent talk by Prof. Richard Lester, Chairman of the MIT Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering that also explained how nuclear energy contributes to assuring a secure and adequate energy supply to meet present and future needs.

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Yes Vermont Yankee – Meredith Angwin

Decommissioning, Governor Shumlin, and Dry Cask Storage

At Yes Vermont Yankee, Meredith Angwin defends her assertion that the Vermont state government is finally learning about nuclear energy.  She discusses Entergy’s decision to use SAFSTOR, Governor Shulin’s odd timelines, and more.

(Meredith also nominated her own post this week at ANS Nuclear Cafe which also covers the Vermont Yankee situation – a nomination we agree with!)

Moving Forward and Living Well

At ANS Nuclear Cafe, Meredith Angwin analyzed the probable future choices for people who currently work at Vermont Yankee.  Younger, nuclear-trained people should have an easy time of the transition when the plant closes.  They will simply move away.  For others, the transition may be much harder.

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The Hiroshima Syndrome – Les Corrice

Les Corrice covers the February 28th PBS report “Inside the slow and dangerous cleanup of the Fukushima nuclear crisis,” showing it to be nothing more than the worst kind of fearmongering.  The obvious intent of the special, according to Corrice, is to scare and upset viewers with exaggeration, innuendo and thinly-veiled conspiracy theories, all predicated upon fostering fear, uncertainty and doubt.

Corrice also looks at what might have happened had Naoto Kan not been inserted into the decision-making process for venting the containments at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear station.  Corrice’s assessment is that there may not have been hydrogen gas explosions, no evacuation and shorter recovery time.

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Forbes – Jim Conca

WIPP is Still the Best and Only Choice for Nuclear Waste

The only operating deep underground geologic nuclear waste repository had its first minor accident on Valentine’s Day.  The amount of radiation released into the environment was a million times less than any EPA action levels, but to hear the outcry you’d think it was Chernobyl.

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NewsOK Energy Issues – Robert Bruce Hayes

WIPP Radioactivity Release

Robert Bruce Hayes has, as stated in this article, “been at the WIPP site almost every day after the event.”  Hayes feels that statements from someone who is there are vital; he provides perspective and in addition opens up for questions.

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Atomic Power Review – Will Davis

More Nuclear Energy for Mexico?

In a brief post, Davis observes that a recent Korean press piece on KEPCO energy exports has surprisingly revealed Mexico’s revitalized plan to greatly increase the percentage of energy it generates by nuclear fission.

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Next Big Future – Brian Wang

China wants to export nuclear plants

South China Morning Post reports that Beijing-based State Nuclear
plans to start construction of the first CAP1400 demonstration reactor
in Shidaowan, Shandong province, this year and commission it in late
2018, according to Xinhua.

The schedule is about a year behind the original target as Beijing
suspended new projects for about 18 months to review the safety of all
nuclear power projects after Japan’s Fukushima disaster in 2011.

The two other state-owned nuclear power plant developers, China
National Nuclear and China General Nuclear Power, have also been
looking for opportunities to expand abroad, even though they have the
world’s biggest nuclear power expansion programme to complete.

After raising industry safety standards, Beijing set a target for the
country’s installed nuclear generating capacity of 58GW by 2020, up
from 12.57GW now, although insiders had believed the industry was
capable of generating 70 to 80GW.

China’s nuclear companies are in talks to export to Brazil, UK and
South Africa and other countries

That’s it for this week’s submitted entries.  Thanks to all of the contributors for great content this week on a wide variety of issues.

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 195

ferris wheel 202x201The 195th Carnival of Nuclear Energy is posted today at Atomic Power Review.  You can click here to access this latest entry in a long-running tradition among the top pro-nuclear bloggers and authors.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance, improved health, and broadened security through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 192

ferris wheel 202x201It’s time for the 192nd Carnival of Nuclear Energy, in which the world’s top pro-nuclear bloggers and authors entertain and inform us with their best posts and stories.

The field is wide this week – so let’s get right to it!

 

Nuke Power Talk / Gail Marcus

Fire and Risk

At Nuke Power Talk, Gail Marcus speculates what might have happened in the past if our Stone Age ancestors had known then what we know now about the potential dangers of any technology, and draws from this a message of how we should deal with the knowledge of such risks.

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Atomic Insights – Rod Adams

Russia Using Oil Wealth to Finance Nuclear Exports

Russia’s announcement that it plans to lend Hungary $14 billion to finance the expansion of the Paks nuclear power station is one more piece of evidence showing that Russia continues to diversify its income by exporting nuclear power stations to as large a market as possible. It is winning sales competitions by providing as complete a product as the customer desires.

Radiation:  The Facts

Rod Adams highly recommends a terrific brochure titled “Radiation: The Facts”. The document concentrates accurate information about radiation into a a tri-fold that can be read and understood in just a few minutes. It is a valuable presentation handout, would be a useful addition to the material offered in doctor’s offices, and should be a part of any classroom discussion about radiation.

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Yes Vermont Yankee – Meredith Angwin

Take Action:  Comments to the Public Service Board

Vermont Yankee will close at the end of this year when it finishes its fuel cycle. In December, after lengthy negotiations, Vermont agencies and Entergy signed an agreement. This agreement ends lawsuits, obligates Entergy to pay around $40 million dollars into various funds, and says that the state will allow the plant to run until the end of its fuel cycle.  However, the agreement does not take effect unless the Public Service Board rules.  In this post, Meredith Angwin encourages people to comment to the Public Service Board. She provides a link for comments, as well as links to the agreement and other back-up documentation.

Can Entergy Trust the State?  Comments by John McClaughry

In this post, John McClaughry of the Ethan Allen Institute shares his comments to the Public Service Board about the Entergy-State agreement. He urges the Public Service Board to ratify the agreement. He briefly reviews the history of Vermont Yankee. And he asks the important question: “Can Entergy trust the state of Vermont?”

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ANS Nuclear Cafe

“An Ethos of Nuclear Reactor Safety” by Sherrell R. Greene

The mantle of nuclear safety guardianship is passing to a new generation. What has history taught us about the way a nuclear safety expert should approach his or her profession?

“A Century of Technology – Remarks by Richard Rhodes”

Richard Rhodes, historian and best-selling author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Making of the Atomic Bomb, was the keynote speaker at a special dinner at the 2013 ANS Winter Meeting commemorating the 75th anniversary of the discovery of nuclear fission.

An inspiring review of advances in science and technology that have vastly improved our well-being and transformed the world over the past century – with particular emphasis on the revolutionary role of nuclear science and technology.

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The Hiroshima Syndrome – Les Corrice

Fukushima Child Thyroid Issue

A synopsis of reports published in Fukushima Updates and Fukushima Commentary on the Hiroshima Syndrome site between March 2011 and January 2014.

Fukushima and Cesium

The facts concerning the radioactive cesium at the Fukushima Daiichi station.  The synopsis comes from past posts in the Fukushima Updates and Commentary blogs of the Hiroshima Syndrome website, showing that the cesium risks have been exaggerated.

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Next Big Future – Brian Wang

China has 1400 MWe version of AP1000, rights to export

Nuclear energy still produces triple the energy of wind and solar

Debating about geoengineering and increased nuclear energy

Al Gore doesn’t think climate change important enough to build new nuclear power or start geoengineering

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Forbes – Jim Conca

Wind Energy of No Use in Pacific Northwest

In the Pacific Northwest, hydro-electric power load follows when wind power is available, wiping out any emissions or cost benefit.  Over the last several years, we’ve spent about $5 billion and impacted over 50,000 acres of pristine public land for the privilege of throwing away 9 billion Kw-hrs of carbon-free energy every year.  We can be smarter than this.

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That’s it for this week’s Carnival.  Thanks to all of our entrants for their hard work.

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 191

ferris wheel 202x201The 191st Carnival of Nuclear Energy has been posted at Rick Maltese’s blog “Deregulate the Atom.”  You can click here to see this latest installment of a long-running tradition among the top English language pro-nuclear bloggers and writers.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance, improved health, and broadened security through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

 

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 187

ferris wheel 202x201The 187th Carnival of Nuclear Energy is here – the weekly compilation of the best of the internet’s pro-nuclear authors and bloggers.  This time-honored feature appears on a rotating variety of the top English-language pro-nuclear blogs every weekend, and is a great way for readers of any persuasion or approach to find out what the people who write about nuclear energy all the time think are the most important or most resonant issues for that week.  With that, here are this week’s entries!

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Nuclear News Wire from Michele Kearney

Michele has pointed up this blog post on The Hill, which is really a result of the earlier announcement by the Obama administration that Federal agencies will be targeting a 20% share of renewable energy for their use, but which didn’t mention nuclear.  That announcement prompted this response from the Nuclear Energy Institute, and that was the trigger for the post on The Hill.

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Nuke Power Talk – Gail Marcus

Nuclear Liability – The Logic of Liability Regimes

At Nuke Power Talk, Gail Marcus reacts to an article from Japan arguing that Japan should not adopt the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage, but rather should go after GE, where the author of the article believes the blame lies.  Gail recounts the logic that has led the authors of all the major liability regimes to limit financial responsibility to the operator, and points out how that provides much faster and more certain compensation than an endless series of lawsuits.  She takes on some of the arguments about GE’s liability by the author of the article and points out how a counterargument can be made about the responsibility of the operator.

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Canadian Energy Issues – Steve Aplin

How to tell if electricity decarbonization is working: replace renewable energy standards with a simple carbon standard.

There is no shortage of advice out there about how to decarbonize the economy. A lot of it focuses on electricity, and power generation especially. However, too many jurisdictions have opted for the so-called Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) approach to decarbonizing electric power generation—these mandate a certain percentage of renewable energy like wind and solar. Steve Aplin of Canadian Energy Issues suggests an alternative: a simple carbon emission standard. He holds up spectacular examples that illustrate why the carbon standard approach is far more effective at actually reducing carbon.”

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The Hiroshima Syndrome – Les Corrice

Fukushima Evacuees Get More and More Money, but not Tsunami Victims

An objective comparison between tsunami refugees and Fukushima evacuees paints a very disturbing, and downright infuriating picture. The Fukushima evacuees are far, far better off than tsunami refugees.  Fukushima evacuees have been given many times more temporary housing and a lot more subsistence money.  The world’s press wants everyone to think all is going great with the tsunami victims and horribly with the Fukushima evacuees.  How long will this smoke screen be permitted to exist?

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Next Big Future – Brian Wang

American Physical Society recommends 80 year operating licenses for US nuclear reactors; there are no technical show stoppers.

Senior researchers give a major endorsement to the Lawrenceville plasma physics dense plasma fusion project.

All electric cars would mean 20-50% more electricity generation would be needed in the US and a moderate boost in nuclear energy from uprating and new reactors could be a part of that clean energy and clean transportation future.

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ANS Nuclear Cafe – Mark Reed

The ‘I’m a Nuke’ Project: The Epic Saga of Tim the Vagabond Nuclear

After Tim Lucas completed his PhD in nuclear engineering at MIT, his
insatiable wanderlust compelled him to sail around the world. He shows
and tells the story of his world travels in this video from the ‘I’m A
Nuke’ series – an integral part of the ‘Public Image of the Nuclear
Engineer’ theme at the 2013 ANS Student Conference.

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Yes Vermont Yankee – Meredith Angwin

Vermont Yankee’s Closing Will Hurt Vermont

In this op-ed, Meredith Angwin reviews power contracts, power availability, and Vermont’s relationship with Canadian suppliers and oil-fired plants.  Without Vermont Yankee, electricity will be more expensive, more dependent on fossil fuels, and less reliable.

Reference list about effects of closing Vermont Yankee

The op-ed above was dense with information—perhaps too dense.  In this post, Angwin backs up her op-ed statements with links to FERC reports, newspaper articles, ISO-NE statements and more.  Hopefully, this blog post will also stand alone as a reference list on the electricity outlook in New England.

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USA-CARGO

In Remembrance Of…

A brief piece about the end of the Fast Flux Test Reactor and fuel reprocessing.

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That’s it for this week!  Thanks to all of the authors, and submitters, for a highly informative and relevant set of posts.  (Carnival post for ANS Nuclear Cafe assembled by Will Davis.)