Category Archives: Carnival of nuclear bloggers

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 195

ferris wheel 202x201The 195th Carnival of Nuclear Energy is posted today at Atomic Power Review.  You can click here to access this latest entry in a long-running tradition among the top pro-nuclear bloggers and authors.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance, improved health, and broadened security through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 192

ferris wheel 202x201It’s time for the 192nd Carnival of Nuclear Energy, in which the world’s top pro-nuclear bloggers and authors entertain and inform us with their best posts and stories.

The field is wide this week – so let’s get right to it!

 

Nuke Power Talk / Gail Marcus

Fire and Risk

At Nuke Power Talk, Gail Marcus speculates what might have happened in the past if our Stone Age ancestors had known then what we know now about the potential dangers of any technology, and draws from this a message of how we should deal with the knowledge of such risks.

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Atomic Insights – Rod Adams

Russia Using Oil Wealth to Finance Nuclear Exports

Russia’s announcement that it plans to lend Hungary $14 billion to finance the expansion of the Paks nuclear power station is one more piece of evidence showing that Russia continues to diversify its income by exporting nuclear power stations to as large a market as possible. It is winning sales competitions by providing as complete a product as the customer desires.

Radiation:  The Facts

Rod Adams highly recommends a terrific brochure titled “Radiation: The Facts”. The document concentrates accurate information about radiation into a a tri-fold that can be read and understood in just a few minutes. It is a valuable presentation handout, would be a useful addition to the material offered in doctor’s offices, and should be a part of any classroom discussion about radiation.

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Yes Vermont Yankee – Meredith Angwin

Take Action:  Comments to the Public Service Board

Vermont Yankee will close at the end of this year when it finishes its fuel cycle. In December, after lengthy negotiations, Vermont agencies and Entergy signed an agreement. This agreement ends lawsuits, obligates Entergy to pay around $40 million dollars into various funds, and says that the state will allow the plant to run until the end of its fuel cycle.  However, the agreement does not take effect unless the Public Service Board rules.  In this post, Meredith Angwin encourages people to comment to the Public Service Board. She provides a link for comments, as well as links to the agreement and other back-up documentation.

Can Entergy Trust the State?  Comments by John McClaughry

In this post, John McClaughry of the Ethan Allen Institute shares his comments to the Public Service Board about the Entergy-State agreement. He urges the Public Service Board to ratify the agreement. He briefly reviews the history of Vermont Yankee. And he asks the important question: “Can Entergy trust the state of Vermont?”

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ANS Nuclear Cafe

“An Ethos of Nuclear Reactor Safety” by Sherrell R. Greene

The mantle of nuclear safety guardianship is passing to a new generation. What has history taught us about the way a nuclear safety expert should approach his or her profession?

“A Century of Technology – Remarks by Richard Rhodes”

Richard Rhodes, historian and best-selling author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Making of the Atomic Bomb, was the keynote speaker at a special dinner at the 2013 ANS Winter Meeting commemorating the 75th anniversary of the discovery of nuclear fission.

An inspiring review of advances in science and technology that have vastly improved our well-being and transformed the world over the past century – with particular emphasis on the revolutionary role of nuclear science and technology.

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The Hiroshima Syndrome – Les Corrice

Fukushima Child Thyroid Issue

A synopsis of reports published in Fukushima Updates and Fukushima Commentary on the Hiroshima Syndrome site between March 2011 and January 2014.

Fukushima and Cesium

The facts concerning the radioactive cesium at the Fukushima Daiichi station.  The synopsis comes from past posts in the Fukushima Updates and Commentary blogs of the Hiroshima Syndrome website, showing that the cesium risks have been exaggerated.

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Next Big Future – Brian Wang

China has 1400 MWe version of AP1000, rights to export

Nuclear energy still produces triple the energy of wind and solar

Debating about geoengineering and increased nuclear energy

Al Gore doesn’t think climate change important enough to build new nuclear power or start geoengineering

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Forbes – Jim Conca

Wind Energy of No Use in Pacific Northwest

In the Pacific Northwest, hydro-electric power load follows when wind power is available, wiping out any emissions or cost benefit.  Over the last several years, we’ve spent about $5 billion and impacted over 50,000 acres of pristine public land for the privilege of throwing away 9 billion Kw-hrs of carbon-free energy every year.  We can be smarter than this.

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That’s it for this week’s Carnival.  Thanks to all of our entrants for their hard work.

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 191

ferris wheel 202x201The 191st Carnival of Nuclear Energy has been posted at Rick Maltese’s blog “Deregulate the Atom.”  You can click here to see this latest installment of a long-running tradition among the top English language pro-nuclear bloggers and writers.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance, improved health, and broadened security through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

 

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 187

ferris wheel 202x201The 187th Carnival of Nuclear Energy is here – the weekly compilation of the best of the internet’s pro-nuclear authors and bloggers.  This time-honored feature appears on a rotating variety of the top English-language pro-nuclear blogs every weekend, and is a great way for readers of any persuasion or approach to find out what the people who write about nuclear energy all the time think are the most important or most resonant issues for that week.  With that, here are this week’s entries!

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Nuclear News Wire from Michele Kearney

Michele has pointed up this blog post on The Hill, which is really a result of the earlier announcement by the Obama administration that Federal agencies will be targeting a 20% share of renewable energy for their use, but which didn’t mention nuclear.  That announcement prompted this response from the Nuclear Energy Institute, and that was the trigger for the post on The Hill.

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Nuke Power Talk – Gail Marcus

Nuclear Liability – The Logic of Liability Regimes

At Nuke Power Talk, Gail Marcus reacts to an article from Japan arguing that Japan should not adopt the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage, but rather should go after GE, where the author of the article believes the blame lies.  Gail recounts the logic that has led the authors of all the major liability regimes to limit financial responsibility to the operator, and points out how that provides much faster and more certain compensation than an endless series of lawsuits.  She takes on some of the arguments about GE’s liability by the author of the article and points out how a counterargument can be made about the responsibility of the operator.

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Canadian Energy Issues – Steve Aplin

How to tell if electricity decarbonization is working: replace renewable energy standards with a simple carbon standard.

There is no shortage of advice out there about how to decarbonize the economy. A lot of it focuses on electricity, and power generation especially. However, too many jurisdictions have opted for the so-called Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) approach to decarbonizing electric power generation—these mandate a certain percentage of renewable energy like wind and solar. Steve Aplin of Canadian Energy Issues suggests an alternative: a simple carbon emission standard. He holds up spectacular examples that illustrate why the carbon standard approach is far more effective at actually reducing carbon.”

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The Hiroshima Syndrome – Les Corrice

Fukushima Evacuees Get More and More Money, but not Tsunami Victims

An objective comparison between tsunami refugees and Fukushima evacuees paints a very disturbing, and downright infuriating picture. The Fukushima evacuees are far, far better off than tsunami refugees.  Fukushima evacuees have been given many times more temporary housing and a lot more subsistence money.  The world’s press wants everyone to think all is going great with the tsunami victims and horribly with the Fukushima evacuees.  How long will this smoke screen be permitted to exist?

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Next Big Future – Brian Wang

American Physical Society recommends 80 year operating licenses for US nuclear reactors; there are no technical show stoppers.

Senior researchers give a major endorsement to the Lawrenceville plasma physics dense plasma fusion project.

All electric cars would mean 20-50% more electricity generation would be needed in the US and a moderate boost in nuclear energy from uprating and new reactors could be a part of that clean energy and clean transportation future.

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ANS Nuclear Cafe – Mark Reed

The ‘I’m a Nuke’ Project: The Epic Saga of Tim the Vagabond Nuclear

After Tim Lucas completed his PhD in nuclear engineering at MIT, his
insatiable wanderlust compelled him to sail around the world. He shows
and tells the story of his world travels in this video from the ‘I’m A
Nuke’ series – an integral part of the ‘Public Image of the Nuclear
Engineer’ theme at the 2013 ANS Student Conference.

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Yes Vermont Yankee – Meredith Angwin

Vermont Yankee’s Closing Will Hurt Vermont

In this op-ed, Meredith Angwin reviews power contracts, power availability, and Vermont’s relationship with Canadian suppliers and oil-fired plants.  Without Vermont Yankee, electricity will be more expensive, more dependent on fossil fuels, and less reliable.

Reference list about effects of closing Vermont Yankee

The op-ed above was dense with information—perhaps too dense.  In this post, Angwin backs up her op-ed statements with links to FERC reports, newspaper articles, ISO-NE statements and more.  Hopefully, this blog post will also stand alone as a reference list on the electricity outlook in New England.

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USA-CARGO

In Remembrance Of…

A brief piece about the end of the Fast Flux Test Reactor and fuel reprocessing.

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That’s it for this week!  Thanks to all of the authors, and submitters, for a highly informative and relevant set of posts.  (Carnival post for ANS Nuclear Cafe assembled by Will Davis.)

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 185

ferris wheel 202x201The 185th Carnival of Nuclear Energy has been posted at Atomic Power Review.  You can click here to see this latest installment of a long-running tradition among the top pro-nuclear bloggers and authors.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance, improved health, and broadened security through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 184

ferris wheel 202x201The 184th Carnival of Nuclear Energy has been posted at The Hiroshima Syndrome.  You can click here to access this latest edition of a long-running tradition among the world’s top English-language pro-nuclear authors and bloggers.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance, improved health, and broadened security through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 183

ferris wheel 202x201It’s time for the 183rd Carnival of Nuclear Energy – the weekly rotating feature that brings you the best pro-nuclear authors and bloggers, and their viewpoints on what matters in the fields of nuclear energy and nuclear technology.

Every week, this feature appears at one of the top English-language, pro-nuclear blogs or sites; it’s a great way to keep abreast of what is happening in nuclear fields.

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Yes Vermont Yankee – Meredith Angwin

Nuclear Training and Questions about the Future

For nuclear professionals at Vermont Yankee, will it be easy to fill jobs at other nuclear plants? Or will VY employees need extensive retraining because American nuclear plants are so different from each other?

Renewable Energy Mandates Pose a Threat to Nuclear: Guest post by Jeff Walther

Walther describes how renewables take precedence on the grid, and how this destabilizes the grid and affects the ability of baseload plants to function.  He suggests a solution: all plants bid in to the grid at different price levels: one price if they are allowed to set their own hours, a higher price if they are willing to be dispatched.  (This would level the playing field. Sorry for the pun.)

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Next Big Future – Brian Wang

China’s thorium molten salt nuclear reactor project is looking for energy without water cooling for arid parts of china

The latest IEA world energy forecast to 2035

John slough talks about his nuclear fusion propulsion project and his nuclear fusion energy system

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The Hiroshima Syndrome – Leslie Corrice

Japan Makes a Rational Exposure Calculation Decision; the Nuclear Regulation Authority shifts to personal dosimetry instead of the previous airborne estimations that overestimated actual dose by a factor of three.  Also:  Former Japanese PM’s are Chasing Unicorns; two former PM’s are stumping “no nukes” across the nation, and are naive to the point of absurdity.
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Nuke Power Talk – Gail Marcus

ANS Conference: A Wealth of Anniversaries

Gail Marcus spent the past week at the ANS National Conference, which took place in Washington, DC from Sunday night through Thursday.  In Nuke Power Talk, she provides a few highlights, particularly about the stellar cast of speakers in the opening plenary and the ANS President’s special session.  She also notes that, while the conference was billed as a celebration of 75 years of nuclear fission, some of the speakers identified a number of other important nuclear milestones that we are celebrating this year.

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AREVA North America NEXT ENERGY Blog – submitted by Curtis Roberts

Flexible Operations Keep American Nuclear Facilities Competitive

As increasing numbers of states implement Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) programs and plug in intermittent output renewable energy sources, the steady output of load-following nuclear energy can play an important role in maintaining a stable U.S. electricity grid.

Standing Up for Those Who Served America

On Monday, among the parades, waving flags and memorial services that commemorate Veterans Day, it is important to remember that the members of our military often come home and face a new challenge – civilian life.  Fortunately, there are ways that we, as residents and members of the business community, can show our gratitude to these American heroes.  We can hire veterans.

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NewsOK Science and Technology – Robert Bruce Hayes

Do we really need nuclear weapons?

In a thought-provoking post, Hayes presents some of the argument as to why we have nuclear weapons, the history behind their spread and deployment, and gives the reader a chance to become better informed on this topic of great moral divide.

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Atomic Power Review – Will Davis

SCE releases further information on San Onofre Closure

After a busy week covering the ANS 2013 Winter Meeting, Will restarts the Atomic Power Review blog by posting a fresh release from Southern California Edison that answers some further questions about the real decision making that led to the closure of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station.

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That’s it for this week!  Thanks to all of the authors who submitted posts.

(Carnival post assembled for ANS Nuclear Cafe by Will Davis.)

180th Carnival of Nuclear Energy Bloggers

ferris wheel 202x201The 180th Carnival of Nuclear Bloggers is up right now at The Hiroshima Syndrome.  You can click here to see this latest contribution to a long-standing tradition among the top English-language pro-nuclear authors and bloggers.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 179

ferriswheel 201x268ANS Nuclear Cafe is proud to host the 179th Carnival of Nuclear Energy this week.  This long running tradition features top posts and stories by pro-nuclear authors and bloggers each week, and provides a window into the foremost issues in nuclear energy and nuclear science in a single convenient post.  Here are this week’s entries!

Next Big Future – Brian Wang

Babcock and Wilcox Nuclear Energy is to work with nuclear technology company Lightbridge in developing a pilot plant for manufacturing metal fuel for light water reactors.

Lightbridge has developed an advanced metallic fuel, made from a zirconium-uranium (Zr-U) alloy, which uses a unique composition and fuel rod geometry enabling it to operate at a higher power density than uranium oxide fuels in use today.

Lightbridge is developing innovative, proprietary nuclear fuel technologies designed to significantly enhance the nuclear power industry’s economics and increase power output by:

Extending the fuel cycle length to 24 months or longer while simultaneously increasing the power output by up to 17% in existing pressurized water reactors (PWRs), including Westinghouse 4-loop reactors, which are currently limited to an 18-month fuel cycle; Enabling increased reactor power output (up to 30% increase) without changing the core size in new-build PWRs.

They have a detailed pricing study of providing such upgrades to 16 pressure water reactors.

Nuke Power Talk – Gail Marcus

Women in Engineering

At Nuke Power Talk, Gail Marcus reflects on a recent article citing continuing challenges for women in engineering.  As someone who pursued a career in engineering when the number of women in the field was far smaller than it is today, she confesses to being surprised to learn that there are still such barriers.  She reports some of her own experiences, particularly some comments she had to field during job interviews “back in the day.”

Yes Vermont Yankee – Meredith Angwin

State of Vermont Sues in Favor of Federal Pre-Emptive Regulations

The State of Vermont believes it has the expertise to regulate nuclear safety, but does not have the expertise to regulate wood boilers.  Outdoor wood boilers can cause considerable pollution in rural areas. Many states regulate them, but Vermont is suing the EPA, asking for them to revise their regulations on the boilers.

ANS Nuclear Cafe

“European renewable energy subsidies under fire from major power
generators” by Rod Adams

The leaders of electric power companies owning half of Europe’s
generating capacity have joined together to inform the European Union
that its policies are leading to a dangerously unstable power grid.  In
addition, the power suppliers are concerned that their continent is not
on a path to achieve its CO2 emissions targets and they are worried
about the response of customers that continue to see their electricity
bills rise.  The European utility CEO’s are calling for reform of the
continent’s power markets and energy policy.

Atomic Insights – Rod Adams

First hand report from trained US Navy radiation worker about experience associated with Fukushima

Rod Adams found two first hand reports from nuclear trained US Navy sailors stationed in Yokosuka, Japan on the USS George Washington in March 2011. They describe their efforts to monitor their ship and shipmates for radioactive material fallout and explain why high level Navy decision makers made politically correct decisions to overreact when low levels of radiation were detected.
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The Hiroshima Syndrome – Les Corrice
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Something has happened that seems to have caught the anti-nuclear Japanese press ‘off guard.’  Her name is Lady Barbara Judge of Great Britain.  As a result, Japan’s news media is resorting to historical methods of reporting with ‘balance,’ giving her positive statements token mention at the end of each article.
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Atomic Power Review – Will Davis
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Southern California Edison, having been rebuffed in its request to MHI to allow a contractually stipulated audit by SCE of MHI’s processes and procedures has taken the next step – it has requested arbitration.  Details at link.
That’s it for this week’s Carnival!  Thanks to all of the authors for their submissions this week.
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Carnival of Nuclear Energy 178

ferris wheel 202x201The 178th Carnival of Nuclear Energy has been posted at Next Big Future.  You can click here to access this latest edition of a long-standing tradition in the world of English-language, pro-nuclear bloggers and authors.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

 

Carnival of Nuclear Energy Bloggers 173

ferriswheel 201x268The 173rd Carnival of Nuclear Bloggers is up right now in the Fukushima Commentary section of Leslie Corrice’s site “The Hiroshima Syndrome.”  You can click here to access this latest edition.

Topics this week include commentary on, and coverage of, the Vermont Yankee situation and decommissioning from a number of new angles; unexpected fire concerns from solar installations; the release of SONGS steam generator documents; a public relations disaster at Fukushima Daiichi; and the future of the electrical grid round out the topics.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 172

ferris wheel 202x201The 172nd Carnival of Nuclear Energy has been posted at Yes Vermont Yankee.  You can click here to access this latest edition of a long-running tradition among pro-nuclear bloggers.

This week’s Carnival is certainly, for many, tinged with a sense of melancholy, as it is hosted at a blog written for years by someone who is a staunch supporter of nuclear energy and particularly the Vermont Yankee plant, Meredith Angwin.  It was announced this past week that Vermont Yankee would be closing in 2014 instead of refueling, which to many people came as an unexpected and bad surprise.  In a sense, a chapter in pro-nuclear advocacy will close (or at least be transformed) given that a campaign to keep open a scheduled-to-close plant is a blunted arrow – but perhaps, if we’re all lucky, the resilient Angwin will find another way to channel her considerable energy, intellect and experience into further efforts to do what she’s seemingly always done, which is help people learn more about energy of all sorts.

Meredith-AngwinThere were considerations given, and discussion held, behind the scenes in terms of offers by others to host the Carnival this week given these developments.  In a show of steely resolve, Meredith decided to host the Carnival even in the face of this setback.  Perhaps there is no more fitting place for the Carnival to be this week; if nothing else, it will serve as a reminder to pro-nuclear advocates that showing up in debates and having a seat at the table first matters.  It is also, perhaps, a forewarning.  Only time will tell on the latter point. All of this said, Meredith Angwin has headed the Carnival posting this week quite fittingly with her own selections about Vermont Yankee which are important to read and understand.  She has put the matter in plain terms, and in one post has asked a number of questions that we all might have, and provided her well-informed answers.

About the Carnival.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

-Will Davis for ANS Nuclear Cafe-

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 170

ferris wheel 202x201ANS Nuclear Cafe is proud to host the 170th edition of the Carnival of Nuclear Energy – a rotating feature that showcases the best pro-nuclear blogs and authors each week in a single, easy to access compilation.  Contributions are volunteered by the authors, with the exception of “Captain’s Choice” picks that the Carnival host makes from time to time.  With that, let’s get to this week’s posts!

This week, a paper was published that was authored by a graduate student – studying policy – detailing supposed dire security concerns at US nuclear plants.  There was even some misleading information that could have led casual readers to believe the paper was sponsored by the Department of Energy.  Professionals in the nuclear field who read the paper saw right through it, but James Conca stepped up to the plate and provided an excellent and much-needed public rebuttal.

Forbes – James Conca

Anyone Can Write a Story About Nuclear Terrorism

Jim Conca responds to a widely reproduced and quoted paper which at first take portrays the security situation at US nuclear plants as risky, but which falls apart very quickly upon examination.

Canadian Energy Issues – Steve Aplin

Keystone fight approaches criticality: TransCanada’s biggest clean asset stays critical

TransCanada Inc., the favourite pinata of green fashionistas because of its proposal to build the Keystone XL pipeline, is a partner in running the Bruce nuclear plant—the biggest clean energy centre in the western hemisphere. As the fight over Keystone gains intensity, Steve Aplin of Canadian Energy Issues comments on the spectacle of Keystone opponents encouraging greater use of natural gas, a carbon-heavy fossil fuel, in electric power generation. Aplin notes that many of the same Keystone opponents would celebrate if not just the Bruce plant but all nuclear plants were running on natural gas instead of nuclear—even though this would put far more carbon pollution into the air than the pipeline.”

The Hiroshima Syndrome – Leslie Corrice

A Suggested Answer to Fukushima’s Wastewater Question

The wastewater buildup problem at F. Daiichi could be solved by setting up a closed loop.  The decontaminated turbine building waters could be sent back to the basements rather than to above-ground storage tanks.  This would provide several benefits and cause no additional problems.

Nuke Power Talk – Gail Marcus

Irradiated Food:  The Case for More

At Nuke Power Talk, Gail Marcus comments on a recent NRC blog, which in turn used the latest large-scale case of food poisoning (from lettuce imported from Mexico) to point out the safety and value of food irradiation.  Gail repeats some of the health statistics associated with food contamination, which are truly startling, and goes on to make the case for the use of irradiation in our food processing.  She does strike a cautionary note when she recounts the long history of efforts to increase the use of irradiation (including an ANS-centered effort), and hopes that incidents like the latest one will help some people see the light.

ANS Nuclear Cafe

Court Finally Rules on Yucca Mountain’s NRC License Review

After a year-long wait, the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled on
August 13 to grant a writ of mandamus on behalf of petitioners, ordering
the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to resume a review of the Yucca
Mountain nuclear waste repository.

Robert L. Ferguson, one of the citizen petitioners in the case, writes
on the ruling and what it means for the future of high-level waste
policy in the United States.

Power Play: People, Politics, Electricity, Nuclear

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals in New York ruled on August 14 that
Vermont legislators acted improperly in efforts to close the Vermont
Yankee nuclear power plant.

Howard Shaffer provides an overview and update of a busy summer of
energy-related activism, political maneuverings, grid and energy issues,
and of course events related to the Vermont Yankee plant – which
continues to go on providing most of the clean energy in the Green
Mountain State through it all.

Fukushima Daiichi:  Current Hurdles, Options, and Future Expectations

News coming out of Japan continues to be bad concerning the Fukushima Daiichi site – although much of the news is really hyperbolic and erroneous.  The bigger story is the Japanese people’s increasing mistrust of, and lack of faith in, TEPCO.

Will Davis provides the best and latest information on efforts at the site to halt the inflow and outflow of contaminated water as well as whether it’s getting into the ocean (it isn’t.) He also covers the decommissioning of the plant, and future options for this major project.

Yes Vermont Yankee – Meredith Angwin

Vermont Yankee Wins in Federal Appeals Court

Did the Vermont legislature try to regulate nuclear safety? Well, they did write a law that specifies how the fuel rods must be arranged in the fuel pool. Background, quotes, and more.

Next Big Future – Brian Wang

Husab Uranium Mine

Update on uranium mines.  Husab is gearing up for full 7500 ton per year production in 2017.  The Haggan mine is still pushing forward, and Tanzania is heading toward 14000 tons per year.

Nuclear Energy Roundup:  Russia has Big Ambitions

More nuclear power will allow Russia to export more oil and gas, and government plans call for nuclear energy to amount to 25 percent of the domestic energy market by 2030, up from 16 percent (currently produced by 33 reactors.)  Russia has nine reactors under construction, making it the world’s second busiest market behind China.  ROSATOM head Sergey Kiriyenko has predicted that China will soon become Russia’s main competitor on the global nuclear energy market.

NewsOK Science and Technology – Robert Hayes

Environmental Radiological Contamination

Robert Hayes explains radiological contamination, varied levels of risk, and points out that if it weren’t for potassium, which is radioactive, we’d all be dead.  A solid, brief, no-hype look at our radioactive world.

NEI Nuclear Notes

(ANS Cafe note:  Will Davis, in assembling the Carnival for ANS this week, has made a “Captain’s Choice” and included posts from NEI Nuclear Notes, with the blessing of Eric McErlain of NEI.)

The recent publication of a paper questioning the security of nuclear plants in the United States has already been mentioned at the top of this Carnival posting.  Not surprisingly, the Nuclear Energy Institute has also responded in an official capacity as representing the US nuclear industry, with both a descriptive blog post (first link) and also a post that links to an official NEI Statement on the topic.

A Fresh Perspective on Nuclear Plant Security

NEI responds to NPPP Report on Security at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants

Atomic Power Review – Will Davis

Russian Nuclear Sub Decommissioning – Sayda Bay

In what has developed into a brief series covering decommissioning of nuclear submarines, Will Davis takes a look at the massive improvements that have been made in the situation regarding Russian nuclear submarine decommissioning and notes similarities to the US Navy’s long-running program.

That’s it for this week’s Carnival.  Thanks to all of the authors who submitted posts in this very busy week for nuclear advocates!

 

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 169

ferris wheel 202x201The 169th Carnival of Nuclear Energy posted over the weekend at Next Big Future.  Click here to see the latest edition of this time-honored tradition among the best pro-nuclear English-language bloggers.

This week, there are posts not just about Fukushima Daiichi, but also about the future of nuclear energy — and the myriad forms that future might take.  Electric grid issues are addressed in other posts, and fusion energy also gets a major share of this week’s coverage.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 168

ferris wheel 202x201The 168th Carnival of Nuclear Energy has been posted at The Hiroshima Syndrome.  You can click here to see this latest edition of a long-running tradition.

Leslie Corrice, host of this week’s extravaganza, notes that this week features coverage of “why nuke plants are a compelling option, whether or not former anti-nukes are trustworthy pro-nukes, the potential for robotics with nuclear energy, why more nuclear energy would be beneficial, and the latest news about the groundwater contamination problem at Fukushima Daiichi.”

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.