Category Archives: Carnival of nuclear bloggers

Carnival of Nuclear Energy Bloggers 173

ferriswheel 201x268The 173rd Carnival of Nuclear Bloggers is up right now in the Fukushima Commentary section of Leslie Corrice’s site “The Hiroshima Syndrome.”  You can click here to access this latest edition.

Topics this week include commentary on, and coverage of, the Vermont Yankee situation and decommissioning from a number of new angles; unexpected fire concerns from solar installations; the release of SONGS steam generator documents; a public relations disaster at Fukushima Daiichi; and the future of the electrical grid round out the topics.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 172

ferris wheel 202x201The 172nd Carnival of Nuclear Energy has been posted at Yes Vermont Yankee.  You can click here to access this latest edition of a long-running tradition among pro-nuclear bloggers.

This week’s Carnival is certainly, for many, tinged with a sense of melancholy, as it is hosted at a blog written for years by someone who is a staunch supporter of nuclear energy and particularly the Vermont Yankee plant, Meredith Angwin.  It was announced this past week that Vermont Yankee would be closing in 2014 instead of refueling, which to many people came as an unexpected and bad surprise.  In a sense, a chapter in pro-nuclear advocacy will close (or at least be transformed) given that a campaign to keep open a scheduled-to-close plant is a blunted arrow – but perhaps, if we’re all lucky, the resilient Angwin will find another way to channel her considerable energy, intellect and experience into further efforts to do what she’s seemingly always done, which is help people learn more about energy of all sorts.

Meredith-AngwinThere were considerations given, and discussion held, behind the scenes in terms of offers by others to host the Carnival this week given these developments.  In a show of steely resolve, Meredith decided to host the Carnival even in the face of this setback.  Perhaps there is no more fitting place for the Carnival to be this week; if nothing else, it will serve as a reminder to pro-nuclear advocates that showing up in debates and having a seat at the table first matters.  It is also, perhaps, a forewarning.  Only time will tell on the latter point. All of this said, Meredith Angwin has headed the Carnival posting this week quite fittingly with her own selections about Vermont Yankee which are important to read and understand.  She has put the matter in plain terms, and in one post has asked a number of questions that we all might have, and provided her well-informed answers.

About the Carnival.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

-Will Davis for ANS Nuclear Cafe-

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 170

ferris wheel 202x201ANS Nuclear Cafe is proud to host the 170th edition of the Carnival of Nuclear Energy – a rotating feature that showcases the best pro-nuclear blogs and authors each week in a single, easy to access compilation.  Contributions are volunteered by the authors, with the exception of “Captain’s Choice” picks that the Carnival host makes from time to time.  With that, let’s get to this week’s posts!

This week, a paper was published that was authored by a graduate student – studying policy – detailing supposed dire security concerns at US nuclear plants.  There was even some misleading information that could have led casual readers to believe the paper was sponsored by the Department of Energy.  Professionals in the nuclear field who read the paper saw right through it, but James Conca stepped up to the plate and provided an excellent and much-needed public rebuttal.

Forbes – James Conca

Anyone Can Write a Story About Nuclear Terrorism

Jim Conca responds to a widely reproduced and quoted paper which at first take portrays the security situation at US nuclear plants as risky, but which falls apart very quickly upon examination.

Canadian Energy Issues – Steve Aplin

Keystone fight approaches criticality: TransCanada’s biggest clean asset stays critical

TransCanada Inc., the favourite pinata of green fashionistas because of its proposal to build the Keystone XL pipeline, is a partner in running the Bruce nuclear plant—the biggest clean energy centre in the western hemisphere. As the fight over Keystone gains intensity, Steve Aplin of Canadian Energy Issues comments on the spectacle of Keystone opponents encouraging greater use of natural gas, a carbon-heavy fossil fuel, in electric power generation. Aplin notes that many of the same Keystone opponents would celebrate if not just the Bruce plant but all nuclear plants were running on natural gas instead of nuclear—even though this would put far more carbon pollution into the air than the pipeline.”

The Hiroshima Syndrome – Leslie Corrice

A Suggested Answer to Fukushima’s Wastewater Question

The wastewater buildup problem at F. Daiichi could be solved by setting up a closed loop.  The decontaminated turbine building waters could be sent back to the basements rather than to above-ground storage tanks.  This would provide several benefits and cause no additional problems.

Nuke Power Talk – Gail Marcus

Irradiated Food:  The Case for More

At Nuke Power Talk, Gail Marcus comments on a recent NRC blog, which in turn used the latest large-scale case of food poisoning (from lettuce imported from Mexico) to point out the safety and value of food irradiation.  Gail repeats some of the health statistics associated with food contamination, which are truly startling, and goes on to make the case for the use of irradiation in our food processing.  She does strike a cautionary note when she recounts the long history of efforts to increase the use of irradiation (including an ANS-centered effort), and hopes that incidents like the latest one will help some people see the light.

ANS Nuclear Cafe

Court Finally Rules on Yucca Mountain’s NRC License Review

After a year-long wait, the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled on
August 13 to grant a writ of mandamus on behalf of petitioners, ordering
the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to resume a review of the Yucca
Mountain nuclear waste repository.

Robert L. Ferguson, one of the citizen petitioners in the case, writes
on the ruling and what it means for the future of high-level waste
policy in the United States.

Power Play: People, Politics, Electricity, Nuclear

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals in New York ruled on August 14 that
Vermont legislators acted improperly in efforts to close the Vermont
Yankee nuclear power plant.

Howard Shaffer provides an overview and update of a busy summer of
energy-related activism, political maneuverings, grid and energy issues,
and of course events related to the Vermont Yankee plant – which
continues to go on providing most of the clean energy in the Green
Mountain State through it all.

Fukushima Daiichi:  Current Hurdles, Options, and Future Expectations

News coming out of Japan continues to be bad concerning the Fukushima Daiichi site – although much of the news is really hyperbolic and erroneous.  The bigger story is the Japanese people’s increasing mistrust of, and lack of faith in, TEPCO.

Will Davis provides the best and latest information on efforts at the site to halt the inflow and outflow of contaminated water as well as whether it’s getting into the ocean (it isn’t.) He also covers the decommissioning of the plant, and future options for this major project.

Yes Vermont Yankee – Meredith Angwin

Vermont Yankee Wins in Federal Appeals Court

Did the Vermont legislature try to regulate nuclear safety? Well, they did write a law that specifies how the fuel rods must be arranged in the fuel pool. Background, quotes, and more.

Next Big Future – Brian Wang

Husab Uranium Mine

Update on uranium mines.  Husab is gearing up for full 7500 ton per year production in 2017.  The Haggan mine is still pushing forward, and Tanzania is heading toward 14000 tons per year.

Nuclear Energy Roundup:  Russia has Big Ambitions

More nuclear power will allow Russia to export more oil and gas, and government plans call for nuclear energy to amount to 25 percent of the domestic energy market by 2030, up from 16 percent (currently produced by 33 reactors.)  Russia has nine reactors under construction, making it the world’s second busiest market behind China.  ROSATOM head Sergey Kiriyenko has predicted that China will soon become Russia’s main competitor on the global nuclear energy market.

NewsOK Science and Technology – Robert Hayes

Environmental Radiological Contamination

Robert Hayes explains radiological contamination, varied levels of risk, and points out that if it weren’t for potassium, which is radioactive, we’d all be dead.  A solid, brief, no-hype look at our radioactive world.

NEI Nuclear Notes

(ANS Cafe note:  Will Davis, in assembling the Carnival for ANS this week, has made a “Captain’s Choice” and included posts from NEI Nuclear Notes, with the blessing of Eric McErlain of NEI.)

The recent publication of a paper questioning the security of nuclear plants in the United States has already been mentioned at the top of this Carnival posting.  Not surprisingly, the Nuclear Energy Institute has also responded in an official capacity as representing the US nuclear industry, with both a descriptive blog post (first link) and also a post that links to an official NEI Statement on the topic.

A Fresh Perspective on Nuclear Plant Security

NEI responds to NPPP Report on Security at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants

Atomic Power Review – Will Davis

Russian Nuclear Sub Decommissioning – Sayda Bay

In what has developed into a brief series covering decommissioning of nuclear submarines, Will Davis takes a look at the massive improvements that have been made in the situation regarding Russian nuclear submarine decommissioning and notes similarities to the US Navy’s long-running program.

That’s it for this week’s Carnival.  Thanks to all of the authors who submitted posts in this very busy week for nuclear advocates!

 

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 169

ferris wheel 202x201The 169th Carnival of Nuclear Energy posted over the weekend at Next Big Future.  Click here to see the latest edition of this time-honored tradition among the best pro-nuclear English-language bloggers.

This week, there are posts not just about Fukushima Daiichi, but also about the future of nuclear energy — and the myriad forms that future might take.  Electric grid issues are addressed in other posts, and fusion energy also gets a major share of this week’s coverage.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 168

ferris wheel 202x201The 168th Carnival of Nuclear Energy has been posted at The Hiroshima Syndrome.  You can click here to see this latest edition of a long-running tradition.

Leslie Corrice, host of this week’s extravaganza, notes that this week features coverage of “why nuke plants are a compelling option, whether or not former anti-nukes are trustworthy pro-nukes, the potential for robotics with nuclear energy, why more nuclear energy would be beneficial, and the latest news about the groundwater contamination problem at Fukushima Daiichi.”

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 164

ferris wheel 202x201The 164th Carnival of Nuclear Energy is up right now at Next Big Future.  Click here to see this latest assemblage of pro-nuclear reporting and analysis.

This week’s Carnival is truly worldwide, as developments not only in the U.S. but also in Canada, Japan, India, Pakistan and Vietnam are covered.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, and EntrepreNuke.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 161

ans white logo 300x300This 161st edition of the Carnival of Nuclear Energy, presented at the ANS Nuclear Cafe, comes to you posted from the 2013 ANS Annual Meeting at the Hyatt Regency, Atlanta, Georgia.  Everyone here is excited and energized about this year’s meeting, and we’re proud to host the Carnival in its midst!

Every week, the top pro-nuclear bloggers (and, increasingly, news and op-ed writers) submit their top picks of that week’s content.  Following the Carnival will thus keep you on top of what these highly in-touch, articulate thinkers feel were the hot topics of the week.  With that – let’s get to this week’s entries.

4 Factor Consulting / Margaret Harding

Scare Crow?  Nope, this girl has a brain.    A brief, serious and puzzling illness some time back exposed Margaret Harding to nuclear medicine; here is the story.

Yes Vermont Yankee / Meredith Angwin

San Onofre Reactions; the Accurate, the Mixed, and the Ugly.  In this blog post, Meredith Angwin describes  blogger and newspaper reactions to the closing (the accurate and the mixed) and a Huffington Post discussion of the closing  (the mixed and the ugly).  She embeds the 25 minute video of the Huffington Post debate.

Next Big Future / Brian Wang

Canada Approves the Cigar Lake Uranium Mine.  Old nuclear plant shutdowns would not be notable if there was more new nuclear construction.

Pakistan to build 1100 MWe reactors.  Construction will begin next year — probably the first eight to be completed by 2030.

Nuke Power Talk / Gail Marcus

There’s More to Him than His Hair!   Gail Marcus takes a look on the light side this week at Nuke Power Talk, commenting on the to-do in the press about Ernie Moniz’s hair.  She does note that we should be more focused on what is in his head than what is on it.

Atomic Insights / Rod Adams

UCS Guilty of Harming Humans by Reinforcing Fear Mongering.   Fighting back against UCS’s (Union of Concerned Scientists) negatively-slanted review of Pandora’s Promise and its unjustified attack on Gwyneth Cravens and Robert Stone.

ANS Nuclear Cafe – submitted by Paul Bowersox

Environmental Impact Evaluations – Seeing the Bigger (Nuclear vs.
Fossil) Picture“   With the announcement last week of the closing of San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, and ongoing additional NRC environmental impact
evaluations of long-term storage of spent fuel – Jim Hopf notes that
nuclear risks are being evaluated in isolation, while overall impacts of
the alternatives are not being considered.

Atomic Power Review / Will Davis

San Onofre Officially Shut Down.   For the record, here is the press release from SCE documenting the official notification to NRC that SONGS was permanently shut down.  The previous post on the blog is the original announcement that SCE / SDE&G had decided to retire the plant, but had not notified NRC yet.

ANS2013checkinThat’s it for this week’s Carnival.  As you can see at right, the American Nuclear Society’s 2013 Annual Meeting is underway, with folks at the registration desk signing in and various meetings already well underway.  We hope to see you here this week!

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 160

ferriswheel 201x268The 160th Carnival of Nuclear Energy is up at Meredith Angwin’s “Yes Vermont Yankee” blog.  You can click here to access this latest edition in a long-running tradition (over three years now!) that showcases the best pro-nuclear blogs each week.

This week’s contributions are, as might be expected, headlined by news about the announcement at the end of the week that San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station will be retired (and eventually decommissioned.)  There are however a number of other things, more favorable to nuclear energy, in the news too including plant uprates, internships for nuclear engineers, and information on the new film ‘Pandora’s Promise.’

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, and EntrepreNuke.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 159

ferris wheelThe 159th Carnival of Nuclear Energy is up right now at Next Big Future.  You can click here to get to this latest edition of the nuclear blogosphere’s flagship promotion.

Ten posts this week cover a very wide range of topics that include, among others, a lesson on the handling of risk communication, carbon trading in China, laser uranium enrichment, and why having nuclear plants in our back yards isn’t such a bad thing.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, and EntrepreNuke.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 158

carnivalThe 158th Carnival of Nuclear Energy is up at Atomic Power Review.  You can click here to access the latest edition of this long-running weekly compilation of top posts from the internet’s nuclear blogs.

This week’s topics include “Black Start” diesels, restarting reactors in Japan, nuclear waste (and how it’s not always something to be feared), an entertaining post about nuclear engineers with side jobs… and more!

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, and EntrepreNuke.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 157

ferriswheel 201x268The 157th Carnival of Nuclear Energy is up at the Hiroshima Syndrome – click here to access the latest edition of this long-running weekly compilation of top posts from the internet’s nuclear blogs.

Topics this week include – A nuclear “geek” takes a “vacation”, what closing a nuke in Canada would do to carbon emissions, Japan’s new regulatory agency, fear of uncontaminated groundwater among Fukushima fishermen, a testimony overview from the Vermont legislature, and more.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, and EntrepreNuke.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Carnival of Nuclear Bloggers 154

carnivalThe 154th Carnival of Nuclear Bloggers is available now at Atomic Power Review.  Click here to access this latest edition.

The topics this week include a wide range of radiation effects related and environment related issues – a reflection of the just-passed Earth Day.  The final installment of a major tour project is included, as are pieces on technical and legal aspects of nuclear energy.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of top nuclear posts of the week represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, and EntrepreNuke.

If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support. Please post a Tweet, a Facebook entry, or a link on your Web site or blog to support the Carnival.

 

Carnival of Nuclear Bloggers 152

ferris wheel 1 220x201The 152nd Carnival of Nuclear Bloggers is available now at “The Hiroshima Syndrome.”  You can click here to see this latest edition, which contains a varied array of topics and authors sure to provide something of interest for everyone.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of top nuclear posts of the week represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, Idaho Samizdat, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, and CoolHandNuke.

If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support. Please post a Tweet, a Facebook entry, or a link on your Web site or blog to support the Carnival.

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 151

star of nanchang 201x301The 151st Carnival of Nuclear Energy is at Next Big Future. Click here to access the latest edition of the Carnival.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of top nuclear posts of the week represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, Idaho Samizdat, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, and CoolHandNuke.

If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support. Please post a Tweet, a Facebook entry, or a link on your Web site or blog to support the Carnival.

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 150

carnival 201x201The 150th Carnival of Nuclear Energy appeared over the weekend at Atomic Power Review. Click here to access the latest edition of the Carnival.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language pro-nuclear blogs. This rotating feature and the submissions made for inclusion in it represent the dedication and focus of those who believe in nuclear energy and are willing to stand up for it.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, Idaho Samizdat, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, and CoolHandNuke.

If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support. Please post a Tweet, a Facebook entry, or a link on your Web site or blog to support the carnival.

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