Tag Archives: blog carnival

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 192

ferris wheel 202x201It’s time for the 192nd Carnival of Nuclear Energy, in which the world’s top pro-nuclear bloggers and authors entertain and inform us with their best posts and stories.

The field is wide this week – so let’s get right to it!

 

Nuke Power Talk / Gail Marcus

Fire and Risk

At Nuke Power Talk, Gail Marcus speculates what might have happened in the past if our Stone Age ancestors had known then what we know now about the potential dangers of any technology, and draws from this a message of how we should deal with the knowledge of such risks.

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Atomic Insights – Rod Adams

Russia Using Oil Wealth to Finance Nuclear Exports

Russia’s announcement that it plans to lend Hungary $14 billion to finance the expansion of the Paks nuclear power station is one more piece of evidence showing that Russia continues to diversify its income by exporting nuclear power stations to as large a market as possible. It is winning sales competitions by providing as complete a product as the customer desires.

Radiation:  The Facts

Rod Adams highly recommends a terrific brochure titled “Radiation: The Facts”. The document concentrates accurate information about radiation into a a tri-fold that can be read and understood in just a few minutes. It is a valuable presentation handout, would be a useful addition to the material offered in doctor’s offices, and should be a part of any classroom discussion about radiation.

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Yes Vermont Yankee – Meredith Angwin

Take Action:  Comments to the Public Service Board

Vermont Yankee will close at the end of this year when it finishes its fuel cycle. In December, after lengthy negotiations, Vermont agencies and Entergy signed an agreement. This agreement ends lawsuits, obligates Entergy to pay around $40 million dollars into various funds, and says that the state will allow the plant to run until the end of its fuel cycle.  However, the agreement does not take effect unless the Public Service Board rules.  In this post, Meredith Angwin encourages people to comment to the Public Service Board. She provides a link for comments, as well as links to the agreement and other back-up documentation.

Can Entergy Trust the State?  Comments by John McClaughry

In this post, John McClaughry of the Ethan Allen Institute shares his comments to the Public Service Board about the Entergy-State agreement. He urges the Public Service Board to ratify the agreement. He briefly reviews the history of Vermont Yankee. And he asks the important question: “Can Entergy trust the state of Vermont?”

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ANS Nuclear Cafe

“An Ethos of Nuclear Reactor Safety” by Sherrell R. Greene

The mantle of nuclear safety guardianship is passing to a new generation. What has history taught us about the way a nuclear safety expert should approach his or her profession?

“A Century of Technology – Remarks by Richard Rhodes”

Richard Rhodes, historian and best-selling author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Making of the Atomic Bomb, was the keynote speaker at a special dinner at the 2013 ANS Winter Meeting commemorating the 75th anniversary of the discovery of nuclear fission.

An inspiring review of advances in science and technology that have vastly improved our well-being and transformed the world over the past century – with particular emphasis on the revolutionary role of nuclear science and technology.

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The Hiroshima Syndrome – Les Corrice

Fukushima Child Thyroid Issue

A synopsis of reports published in Fukushima Updates and Fukushima Commentary on the Hiroshima Syndrome site between March 2011 and January 2014.

Fukushima and Cesium

The facts concerning the radioactive cesium at the Fukushima Daiichi station.  The synopsis comes from past posts in the Fukushima Updates and Commentary blogs of the Hiroshima Syndrome website, showing that the cesium risks have been exaggerated.

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Next Big Future – Brian Wang

China has 1400 MWe version of AP1000, rights to export

Nuclear energy still produces triple the energy of wind and solar

Debating about geoengineering and increased nuclear energy

Al Gore doesn’t think climate change important enough to build new nuclear power or start geoengineering

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Forbes – Jim Conca

Wind Energy of No Use in Pacific Northwest

In the Pacific Northwest, hydro-electric power load follows when wind power is available, wiping out any emissions or cost benefit.  Over the last several years, we’ve spent about $5 billion and impacted over 50,000 acres of pristine public land for the privilege of throwing away 9 billion Kw-hrs of carbon-free energy every year.  We can be smarter than this.

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That’s it for this week’s Carnival.  Thanks to all of our entrants for their hard work.

Carnival of Nuclear Energy 184

ferris wheel 202x201The 184th Carnival of Nuclear Energy has been posted at The Hiroshima Syndrome.  You can click here to access this latest edition of a long-running tradition among the world’s top English-language pro-nuclear authors and bloggers.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language nuclear blogs. This rotating feature of nuclear “posts of the week” represents the dedication of those who are working toward a future of energy abundance, improved health, and broadened security through nuclear science and technology.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, and Deregulate the Atom.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support.  If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

Carnival of Nuclear Bloggers 148

The 148th edition of the Carnival of Nuclear Bloggers is up now at Hiroshima Syndrome.  Click here to access the site; the Carnival is at the top of the page.

The Carnival this week contains more valuable content on the 2nd anniversary of the earthquake and tsunami in Japan, specific of course to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident.  Radiation and risk are also discussed, as us uranium mining and mine workers’ health as well as other topics.

Each week, a new edition of the Carnival is hosted at one of the top English-language pro-nuclear blogs.  This rotating feature and the submissions made for inclusion in it represent the dedication and focus of those who believe in nuclear energy and are willing to stand up for it.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, Idaho Samizdat, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, Atomic Insights, Hiroshima Syndrome, Things Worse Than Nuclear Power, EntrepreNuke, and CoolHandNuke.

If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support. Please post a Tweet, a Facebook entry, or a link on your Web site or blog to support the carnival.

The 132nd Carnival of Nuclear Energy Bloggers

The 132nd weekly Carnival of Nuclear Energy Bloggers is posted at The Hiroshima Syndrome.  This week’s topics include: Russia’s full-scale push to become totally nuclear by 2100; families of Vermont Yankee employees share what it feels like to be faced with uncertainty about the extension of a nuclear power plant operating license; how emotions should favor nuclear energy; how it seems nuclear energy isn’t that big a political issue in Japan; and natural gas… being more dangerous than nuclear energy. For the full reports, see The Hiroshima Syndrome (the internet’s top source for Fukushima updates and commentary).

The Carnival is the collective voice of blogs by well-respected names that emerge each week to tell the story of nuclear energy.

If you want to hear the voice of the nuclear renaissance, the Carnival of Nuclear Energy Blogs is where to find it.

The publication of the Carnival each week is part of a commitment by the leading pro-nuclear bloggers in North America to speak with a collective voice on the issue of the value of nuclear energy.

While we each have our own points of view, we agree that the promise of peaceful uses of the atom remains viable in our own time and for the future.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, Idaho Samizdat, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, EntrepreNuke, and CoolHandNuke, as well as several other popular nuclear energy blogs.

If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support. Please post a Tweet, a Facebook entry, or a link on your Web site or blog to support the carnival.

The 129th Carnival of Nuclear Energy Bloggers

The 129th weekly Carnival of Nuclear Energy Bloggers is up at Next Big Future.

The Carnival is the collective voice of blogs by well-respected names that emerge each week to tell the story of nuclear energy.

If you want to hear the voice of the nuclear renaissance, the Carnival of Nuclear Energy Blogs is where to find it.

The publication of the Carnival each week is part of a commitment by the leading pro-nuclear bloggers in North America to speak with a collective voice on the issue of the value of nuclear energy.

While we each have our own points of view, we agree that the promise of peaceful uses of the atom remains viable in our own time and for the future.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, Idaho Samizdat, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, and CoolHandNuke, as well as several other popular nuclear energy blogs.

If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support. Please post a Tweet, a Facebook entry, or a link on your Web site or blog to support the carnival.

 

124th Carnival of Nuclear Bloggers now on line

The 124th weekly Carnival of Nuclear Bloggers is up right now at Atomic Power Review.

Each week, the top voices in the pro-nuclear blogging universe come together to present their top posts of the week.  As a result, the Carnival is THE place to go in order to find out what the most popular voices in the nuclear renaissance are saying.  They usually have a lot to say.

The weekly Carnival posts, due to the diverse backgrounds and disciplines of the authors, have a widely varied background that is certain to present something of interest to anyone curious about nuclear energy, or nuclear energy news.

Support those who contribute to this effort by making it count via social media.  That means make a Tweet, or a Facebook post – even a post on your own blog promoting the Carnival.

Those of us who believe that nuclear energy has a safe, viable place work tirelessly to ensure it retains just that.  The bloggers do it for free on their own sites; recognize their efforts by helping to get the word out!

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, Idaho Samizdat, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, and CoolHandNuke, as well as several other popular nuclear energy blogs.

If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

122nd Carnival of Nuclear Energy Bloggers

The weekly Carnival is the collective voice of blogs by many of the Internet’s foremost nuclear experts and advocates, who continue each week to tell the story of nuclear energy around the World Wide Web.

If you want to hear the voice of the nuclear renaissance, the Carnival of Nuclear Energy Blogs is where to find it.

This week’s Carnival

Hearing on disposal of surplus weapons-grade plutonium via MOX fuel caused a stir in Chattanooga.

Wading into the “nuclear zombie” horde

Steve Skutnik at The Neutron Economy posts a “nuclear zombie” survival guide prior to the Chattanooga hearing on disposing of surplus weapons-grade plutonium in MOX fuel, including the most important rule: always remember the double tap (especially for certain “zombie” arguments that just won’t die).

Mixing it up over MOX – a wrapup of from Chattanooga

Following the dust-up in Chattanooga over the use of surplus plutonium for use in MOX fuel, Steve Skutnik gives his account of the meeting highlights, including some of the more specious arguments employed by opponents. Despite the no-show of “nuclear zombies,” there was plenty of necromancy at work with respect to some of the arguments being made against destroying plutonium in MOX fuel.

Plutonium Power for the People

Rod Adams at Atomic Insights writes that one of the biggest threats to the continued wealth and power held by the global fossil fuel industry is a “plutonium economy” fueled by abundant resources of uranium that can be converted into fissile plutonium.

The anti-plutonium propaganda machine has successfully delayed the implementation of extensive breeder reactor programs by several decades.

Today, this propaganda machine continues working to stoke fears of plutonium, because the material is still a threat to the prosperity of the fossil fuel industry. Instead of using former weapons material in conventional reactors in the form of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, people opposed to the use of plutonium would prefer this valuable, energy-dense material to be encapsulated into glass logs and buried deep into the earth’s crust, where even our smarter future generations might have trouble getting to it.

After all, the law of supply and demand tells suppliers that they can make more money when supply is tight; that situation drives prices higher to levels well above the cost of production.

 

Aquatic life and thermal discharge were a focus at Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant

The River and the Rhetoric–Who Speaks for the River

Meredith Angwin at Yes Vermont Yankee describes the Connecticut River Watershed Council. This advocacy group claims that the shad in the Connecticut River are decimated by hot water from Vermont Yankee. One of their soundbytes: “A bad neighbor bakes your wildlife.”

The River, the Shad and the Water Permits describes the record shad run on the Connecticut River this year (one million fish!). The post includes a video clip of Arnie Gundersen saying that there are only 16 shad in the river.

Plant Cooling a Stumbling Block? At the ANS Nuclear Cafe, Howard Shaffer writes that several nuclear power plants are facing challenges concerning water discharge temperatures and the potential for effects on aquatic life.

At Vermont Yankee, as at several other plants, heat rejection includes cooling towers, as well as a river. Opponents use the plant’s thermal discharge as a way to attempt to shut down the plant, or alternately, to harass the plant into unnecessary and expensive use of its cooling towers in all weather. Howard Shaffer considers water issues at Vermont Yankee, and how they are distorted by the plant opponents.

 

Nothing to see here… no, really

No Need to Fret About UT-Austin’s TRIGA Reactor, No Matter What Drudge Might Point To

Eric McErlain at NEI Nuclear Notes wrote on Friday that, in spite of a screaming headline at the Drudge Report about a nuclear reactor evacuation (actually, the UT research reactor is securely located over 10 miles north of campus)… there really was… “nothing to see here.”

 

Climate Change and Nuclear Energy

Is climate change a business opportunity for the nuclear industry?

Suzy Hobbs Baker at the ANS Nuclear Cafe notes that climate science has very important implications for nuclear science.

She writes that the nuclear industry has an opportunity to expand its business by helping to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, support sustainable growth, and create high paying jobs — or as innovative billionaire Sir Richard Branson says, “Doing good is good for business.”

Likewise, she argues that showing lukewarm concern for climate change is bad for the planet, and bad for the nuclear business.

 

World Nuclear Association and Nuclear Energy Institute

A New Head for the World Nuclear Association

Gail Marcus’ at Nuke Power Talk discusses the recent appointment of Agneta Rising as the new Director-General of the World Nuclear Association (WNA). She is to replace John Ritch in this position as of January 1, 2013. Gail notes the critical role that John Ritch played in making the WNA the important and influential force it is today in the global nuclear community, and summarizes the outstanding background that Agneta Rising brings to the position. Although Gail considers John’s performance a tough act to follow, she concludes that Agneta has the capability to continue and further develop the important work of the WNA.

The Need for Multifaceted Energy

Also at Nuke Power Talk, Gail Marcus covers a recent opinion piece by Marvin Fertel, president and CEO of the Nuclear Energy Institute. Now, you might think that someone from NEI would be focusing only on nuclear power, but Fertel points out the need for a multi-faceted energy strategy that includes conservation, efficiency, and a spectrum of energy technologies ranging from fossil to nuclear and renewable energy sources. Gail endorses this position and applauds the head of NEI for taking it.

 

Fukushima

Fukushima Accident Updates

Leslie Corrice at The Hiroshima Syndrome compiles the Internet’s top source of Fukushima accident updates.

September 15: “Fukushima’s waste water decontamination system is a success story”

Fukushima Daiichi’s “makeshift” waste water decontamination system gets critical news coverage every time it has problem. However, there have been no Japanese news stories about the system’s overall unquestionable success. The waste waters remaining in the plant basements are 20 times less radioactive than a year ago. For a “makeshift” technology… it’s doing a great job.

September 10: “America’s Gundersen profits on Japan’s fears”

For the past several weeks, America’s preeminent prophet of nuclear energy doom has been touring Japan. Arnie Gundersen says that Fukushima Daiichi is an accident still-in-progress, with the greatest potential for disaster being the spent fuel pool (SFP) of unit #4. Gundersen’s prolific panderings have precious little real-world evidence to support them, but the Japanese Press and many politicians treat him as an expert voice to be reckoned with. Preaching that Nuclear Judgment Day is an ongoing possibility has become a lucrative endeavor.

 

Asian Tiger

South Korea’s Nuclear Energy Program

Will Davis at Atomic Power Review presents an entirely fresh discussion on the essentials of South Korea’s nuclear energy program. Using materials from the Korean nuclear industry and from Korean press, he fills in the details on the important entities, dates and events in the development of PWR technology in South Korea. If you’ve wondered how this nation so quickly progressed to the point where it can beat all bidders in the UAE’s Barakah nuclear plant program, this article is for you.

 

Nuclear Waste Disposal

Nuclear Waste Disposal in the Permian Basin

Robert Hayes at Science and Technology writes that the Permian Basin (comprising southeast New Mexico and West Texas) is having something of a revival in nuclear technology — from the uranium enrichment plant in Eunice NM, to the soon to come International Isotopes facility, and possibly a monitored retrievable storage site to be built west of Hobbs, New Mexico.

Nuclear waste disposal is one industry already found in the area, including the disposal portions of Waste Control Specialists and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.

 

New Technology

Brayton Cycle Supercritical Engine

Brian Wang at Next Big Future writes that Sandia National Laboratories is seeking an industry partner to market a turbine system that could substantially improve energy efficiency in small modular nuclear reactors.

A supercritical CO2 Brayton-cycle system can reach 50 percent conversion efficiency. Typically, one only gets 30 percent conversion with an [air-based] steam engine. The system is much less expensive to build because it’s very compact, says Sandia’s Gary Rochau. Given its size, it can’t be used in large power plants like coal-fired generators. But it’s well-suited for tiny plants, such as small modular nuclear reactors. A molten salt test pump was recently installed.

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The publication of the Carnival each week is part of a commitment by the leading pro-nuclear bloggers in North America to speak with a collective voice on the issue of the value of nuclear energy.

While we each have our own points of view, we agree that the promise of peaceful uses of the atom remains viable in our own time and for the future.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, Idaho Samizdat, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, and CoolHandNuke, as well as several other popular nuclear energy blogs.

If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support. Please post a Tweet, a Facebook entry, or a link on your Web site or blog to support the carnival.

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121st Carnival of Nuclear Energy Bloggers

The 121st weekly Carnival of Nuclear Energy Bloggers is up at Next Big Future.

The Carnival is the collective voice of blogs by well-respected names that emerge each week to tell the story of nuclear energy.

If you want to hear the voice of the nuclear renaissance, the Carnival of Nuclear Energy Blogs is where to find it.

The publication of the Carnival each week is part of a commitment by the leading pro-nuclear bloggers in North America to speak with a collective voice on the issue of the value of nuclear energy.

While we each have our own points of view, we agree that the promise of peaceful uses of the atom remains viable in our own time and for the future.

Past editions of the carnival have been hosted at Yes Vermont Yankee, Atomic Power Review, ANS Nuclear Cafe, Idaho Samizdat, NEI Nuclear Notes, Next Big Future, and CoolHandNuke, as well as several other popular nuclear energy blogs.

If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brain Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support. Please post a Tweet, a Facebook entry, or a link on your Web site or blog to support the carnival.

# # #

63rd Carnival of Nuclear Energy Bloggers

The heat is on across the United States. The nation’s 104 nuclear reactors are providing electricity to keep people cool without warming the planet.  Nuclear energy can help save habitat for polar bears.

The 63rd Carnival of Nuclear Energy Blogs is online now at Next Big Future.

Scientists have found out that the polar bear is not descended from an Alaskan brown bear. Their DNA most closely resembles that of extinct brown bears in Ireland.

This post is the collective voice of the best pro-nuclear blogs in North America. If you want to hear the voice of the nuclear renaissance, the Carnival of Nuclear Energy Blogs is where to find it.

Past editions have been hosted at NEI Nuclear Notes, ANS Nuclear Cafe, Yes Vermont Yankee, NuclearGreen, Atomic Power Review, Idaho Samizdat, and CoolHandNuke, as well as several other popular nuclear energy blogs.

If you have a pro-nuclear energy blog, and would like to host an edition of the carnival, please contact Brian Wang at Next Big Future to get on the rotation.

This is a great collaborative effort that deserves your support. Please post a Tweet, a Facebook entry, or a link on your Web site or blog to support the carnival.